Oncology


The Era of Immunotherapy in Earlier Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
(NSCLC): What Managed Care Needs to Know for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.

This live webinar series on stage three and earlier NSCLC will provide attendees with critical updates on the advances in ICIs, including how to translate the most recent data into clinical and administrative practice.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Immunotherapies in Stage III and Earlier Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Stage III and Earlier Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunotherapies?

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Stage III and Earlier Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Anticipating and Managing Immune-Related Adverse Events

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Navigating Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of Pancreatic Cancer: Expert Strategies for Patient-Centric Care

Pancreatic cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancers in the US and about 7% of all cancer deaths. In 2019, it is estimated that pancreatic cancer will be responsible for 45,750 deaths among 56,770 new cases. Despite treatment advances, pancreatic cancer is associated with a relatively poor outcome for most patients and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat. Fortunately for patients with pancreatic cancer, several new treatment options, including PARP inhibitors, have become available in recent years or have recently undergone successful late stage clinical trials. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, and significantly delay the progression of metastatic pancreatic cancer in patients with BRCA gene mutations. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, clinicians are increasingly able to select more potent—and soon, more targeted—options for managing this disease.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Integrating the Latest Therapeutic Advances to Optimize Patient Outcomes in Multiple Myeloma: A Closer Look at the Role of Emerging Therapies and MRD

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable. The stage of the disease at presentation is a strong determinant of survival and treatment selection is influenced by the age and general health of the patient, prior therapy, and the presence of complications of the disease. Despite treatment advances in the last several years, MM remains a disease with poor long-term survival as it is currently incurable and all patients will eventually relapse. Fortunately for patients with MM, there are several novel options currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes, achieving a minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative response. MRD has emerged as a vital marker for measuring recurrence and improved response rates in numerous hematological malignancies. MRD-based quantification of remaining diseased cells after treatment has been completed, has in recent years been incorporated into many phase three clinical trials across hematologic malignancies as an endpoint for regulatory approval. With the evolving clinical data pool surrounding the quantification of MRD in MM, healthcare professionals who manage patients with hematologic malignancies and managed care professionals who will review approve these options and tests for insurance coverage require targeted education to ensure a thorough understanding of the benefits of setting MRD negativity as a trial endpoint and treatment goal.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

New Frontiers in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): Patient-Centric Navigation in the Age of Personalized Care

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults and its incidence increases with age. AML has several subtypes for which treatment and prognosis vary and despite 40 years of research, the five-year survival rate has not improved in older patients. Fortunately, new options are able to target specific mutations, to include FLT3, and have been approved for the first time since 1990. Thankfully the AML treatment paradigm has begun to dramatically change, as novel targeted agents have shown improved efficacy and safety outcomes, especially in relapsed or refractory disease. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the AML patient population.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Navigating Treatment Strategies in the Management of Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Expert Perspectives in Immunotherapy

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients surviving for 5 years or more. New and emerging treatments, in particular, immune checkpoint inhibitors have changed the treatment paradigm. Checkpoint inhibitors have shown activity in patients with metastatic bladder cancer in both the first and second-line settings. Some of the new immunotherapeutic options target a protein known as PD-L1 that is expressed at high levels on some cancer cells, while others target PD-1, the receptor protein for PD-L1, on immune cells. Normally, binding of PD-L1 to PD-1 tamps down immune activity. By preventing the interaction between PD-L1 and PD-1, all of these new options can allow the immune system to be more active against tumor cells.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Best Practices in the Treatment of Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC): Expert Perspectives in Immunotherapy

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of tumors that originate in the lip/oral cavity, hypopharynx, oropharynx, nasopharynx, and larynx. An estimated 48,330 new cases are diagnosed annually in the US, and 9,570 people die of the disease. HNSCC historically has been associated with tobacco and alcohol use; however, during the past decade, infection with HPV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a growing subset of HNSCCs. Despite advances and innovations in past years, the prognosis for metastatic disease remains poor. Fortunately for patients with metastatic HNSCC, new immunotherapeutic options, which have shown improved efficacy and safety, have recently become available to give clinicians and managed care professionals more options when managing a population of metastatic HNSCC patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Expanding Options in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: The Impact of Prognostic Biomarkers on Patient Outcomes

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States (US) and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 164,690 new cases diagnosed per year. After evaluating data on the annual spend, treatment decisions and outcomes of prostate cancer, healthcare professionals have determined there are several problems with the traditional diagnostic and clinical pathway. Traditionally, prostate cancer risk has been measured by PSA, Gleason score and stage, while diagnosis and treatment protocols have barely changed. This traditional evaluation doesn’t provide all of the necessary information to appropriately identify prostate cancer risk and accurately determine feasible treatment options. In addition, the most recent guidelines on prostate cancer, published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCC), state the necessary consideration of utilizing gene expression assays in men with low or favorable intermediate disease. Although clinical parameters such as the Gleason score remains the mainstay measurement for prostate cancer severity it does not measure cell proliferation, a critical trait of cancer. This presentation explores novel methods to the prostate cancer treatment paradigm by incorporating a collaborative care approach. This technique includes utilizing prognostic testing with updated gene assays to develop a more accurate diagnosis. Once diagnosis is established the appropriate treatment options can be determined while lowering the cost of care, and ultimately improving outcomes and patient quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Advanced Breast Cancer: Expert Strategies for Improved Patient Outcomes

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer are to be diagnosed in the United States (US) during 2019. The incidence in women in the US is one in eight or about 12%. Death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the advanced setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. Treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as the safety and efficacy profile of available agents. Additionally, an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life are paramount. Fortunately for patients with advanced breast cancer, several new agents, including PARP inhibitors have recently become available. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in the area of HER2- metastatic breast cancer. Nearly 80% of patients with advanced breast cancer have the HER2-negative subtype and therefore are not candidates for HER2-targeting therapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Landscape in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the United States. In 2019, it was expected that liver cancer accounted for approximately 788,000 deaths globally, making it the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The prevalence and mortality rate of liver cancer has been rising steadily over the past decade. This year, approximately 42,030 people in the United States will be diagnosed and 31,780 will die from their disease. Liver cancer is still on the rise and death rates are increasing faster than any other type of cancer. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately for patients with HCC, new agents have become available in the last few years, including targeted therapy. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in patients with disease progression. However, with each new treatment, medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals must stay abreast of the underlying mechanisms, current data, and treatment-emergent adverse events to provide their patients with optimal care. The amount of information surrounding emerging treatments for HCC can be daunting; this conference session will provide these healthcare professionals with a much-needed, concise overview of the available data and strategies.

For the treatment of HCC, transplantation is an option for patients, however, there is a limited supply of good-quality deceased donor organs. Thus, other treatments, including systemic therapy, should be used to bridge patients to transplant or to delay recurrence if possible in unresectable HCC. Fortunately, clinicians have been equipped with new individualized options recently, including targeted therapies, which provide options for the unmet need of treatment in HCC, especially beyond first-line therapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown improved efficacy and safety in HCC, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these options, how they should be integrated into the treatment paradigm, and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option.

As novel targeted therapy options have become available for patients with HCC, medical directors, practicing oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals providing care for patients with HCC are struggling to stay abreast of these advances, especially as it relates to therapy beyond the first line.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Patient-Focused Treatment Decisions in Metastatic Melanoma: An In-Depth Look at the Role of Checkpoint Inhibitors

Melanoma is the most serious and deadly type of skin cancer and according to the National Cancer Institute, will affect about 73,870 people in 2019. Although melanoma is predominately found in the skin, it occurs in melanocytes and may metastasize to any area of the body that contains melanocytes. In the early stages of melanoma, prognosis is usually good for patients but when the melanoma becomes metastatic and spreads to other areas of the body, prognosis is especially poor. For people with stage IV disease, the melanoma has spread beyond the local area into other areas or organs. The most common sites of such spread (metastases) are under the skin (subcutaneous tissue) and other soft tissues (including lymph nodes), the lungs, liver, brain, and bone. In stage IV metastatic melanoma, the goal of treatment is to shrink or get rid of the metastases and prevent the disease from spreading. Recently several new immunotherapies have become available for patients with advanced melanoma, especially in varying treatment settings. These therapies help the immune system sustain an active response in its attack on melanoma cells.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Novel Treatment Approaches in the Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): A Closer Look at Advances in Immunotherapy in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Anticipating and Managing Immune-Related Adverse Events

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

A Deeper Look into Immunotherapies in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Emerging Combination Options in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunotherapies in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)?

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): Expert Strategies for Improved Patient Outcomes

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the United States. Liver cancer is still on the rise and death rates are increasing faster than any other type of cancer. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately for patients with HCC, new agents have recently been approved that provide new options for clinicians in the first-line setting. For the treatment of HCC, transplantation is an option for patients, but there is a limited supply of good-quality donor organs. Thus, other treatments, including systemic therapy, should be used to bridge patients to transplant or to delay recurrence if possible, in unresectable HCC. Fortunately, new options are on the cusp of becoming available in the first-line setting for the first time in 10 years. These options include targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). In addition to newly approved therapies, combination therapy in the second line setting is also changing the treatment paradigm.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Closer Look at the Role of Emerging Therapies

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system. B-cell lymphomas make up most (about 85%) of the NHL in the United States, with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) being the most common at one in three b-cell lymphomas. Recent advances in disease management and our understanding of the biology of NHL have led to a dramatic change in the treatment landscape. Despite this progress, most b-cell NHL has a poor prognosis. Fortunately for patients with NHL, several new agents have become available, including targeted therapy options. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in patients with relapsed disease that have had other therapies. However, with each new treatment, medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals must stay abreast of the underlying mechanisms, current data, and treatment-emergent adverse events to provide their patients with optimal care. The amount of information surrounding emerging treatments for NHL can be daunting; this conference session will provide these healthcare professionals with a much-needed, concise overview of the available data and treatment paradigm.

There are various treatment options for NHL based on the severity of associated symptoms and the rate of cancer growth. Active treatment is started if the patient begins to develop lymphoma-related symptoms or there are signs that the disease is progressing based on testing during follow-up visits. After treatment, many patients can go into a remission that lasts for years; however, this disease should be considered a lifelong condition. Thus relapsed (returns after treatment) disease can occur. Fortunately, clinicians have been equipped with new targeted options for many of the b-cell NHLs, including bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors, in the past few years for patient’s whose disease has relapsed, which provide options for the unmet need of treatment in b-cell NHL. Additionally, the BTK inhibitors that have been approved have indications are growing to include more and more types of b-cell NHL. These options have shown improved efficacy and safety in b-cell NHL, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these options, how they should be integrated into the treatment paradigm, and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: A Closer Look at the Role of Emerging Therapies

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable. The median survival in the prechemotherapy era was about 7 months however new and emerging treatment options are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials and have shown great outcomes and real-world data in their ability to improve clinical and economic outcomes. MM is staged by estimating the myeloma tumor cell mass on the basis of the amount of monoclonal (or myeloma) protein (M protein) in the serum and/or urine, along with various clinical parameters, such as the hemoglobin and serum calcium concentrations, amongst other factors. The stage of the disease at presentation is a strong determinant of survival, but it has little influence on the choice of therapy since almost all patients, except for rare patients with solitary bone tumors or extramedullary plasmacytomas, have generalized disease. Treatment selection is influenced by the age and general health of the patient, prior therapy, and the presence of complications of the disease. Treatment is directed at reducing the tumor cell burden and reversing any complications of disease, such as renal failure, infection, hyperviscosity, or hypercalcemia with appropriate medical management. MM remains a disease with poor long-term survival as it is currently incurable and all patients will eventually relapse, underlining the need for new therapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

Evolving Considerations in the Treatment of Metastatic Bladder Cancer: A Closer Look at the Role of Immunotherapy

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. New and emerging treatments, in particular, immune checkpoint inhibitors such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors have changed the treatment paradigm. Checkpoint inhibitors have shown activity in patients with metastatic bladder cancer in both the second line setting and the first-line settings. Some of the new immunotherapeutic options target a protein known as PD-L1 that is expressed at high levels on some cancer cells, while others target PD-1, the receptor protein for PD-L1, on immune cells. Normally, binding of PD-L1 to PD-1 tamps down immune activity. By preventing the interaction between PD-L1 and PD-1, all of these new options can allow the immune system to be more active against tumor cells.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

Individualizing Treatment in the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer: How Novel Therapies Are Changing the Treatment Paradigm

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). Death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options, however therapy in the metastatic setting focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Fortunately for patients with advanced breast cancer, several new agents have recently become available. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in the area of HER2- metastatic breast cancer. Nearly 80% of patients with advanced breast cancer have the HER2-negative subtype and therefore are not candidates for HER2-targeting therapies. Thankfully, therapy for advanced breast cancer is increasingly personalized due to an array of molecularly targeted/endocrine therapies indicated for recurrent/advanced disease. New classes of targeted agents, including PARP inhibitors, have been recently introduced and are changing the treatment paradigm.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes with Personalized Treatment in the Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, accounting for about 15% of all new cancers and it is expected that there will be about 222,500 new cases of lung cancer in 2019. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, and despite progress in early detection and treatment, prognosis is poor. Fortunately, more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization which have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Additionally, new treatments have just become available for patients with advanced NSCLC that has a neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase (NTRK) gene fusion without a known acquired resistance mutation, giving yet another important option in the evolving management of NSCLC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): Expert Strategies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for roughly 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages. The five-year survival rate has not improved in older patient’s despite 40 years of research. Fortunately for patients with AML, many new treatments have recently been approved for use. These options, which are among the first new treatments in AML since 1990, have begun to drastically change the treatment paradigm. AML has several subtypes and treatment and prognosis vary among subtypes. After AML has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out the subtype. This is especially important, as several new treatments focus on AML disease with certain mutations, including IDH2. Following older treatment paradigms, AML has been cured in 35–40% of people under 60 years old, but only in 5–15% of people over 60 years old.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

Best Practices in the Management of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC): Expert Perspectives on an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Colorectal cancer is the development of cancer from the colon or rectum. People with colorectal cancers that have not spread to distant sites usually have surgery as the main or first treatment. However, for patients with disease that has spread, or become metastatic, surgery is unlikely to cure the disease, and other treatments must be considered, including chemotherapy and targeted therapies, both alone and in combination. Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 70% for regional metastases and 13% for distant metastases. However, the prognosis of patients with mCRC has significantly improved in recent years with the introduction of inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways. Additionally, new treatments have just become available for patients with mCRC that has a neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase (NTRK) gene fusion without a known acquired resistance mutation, giving yet another important option in the evolving management of mCRC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

Integrating New and Emerging Targeted Therapies into the Tx Paradigm in Ovarian Cancer: Expert Strategies for Improved Patient Outcomes

For ovarian cancer patients, the five year survival rate is only 45%. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has greatly changed, providing more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer. Additionally, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

New Treatment Paradigms in CRPC: Enhancing Care through Emerging Diagnostics and Novel Therapies

Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. These deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which occurs when patients’ disease progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone. The treatment of CRPC has dramatically changed over the past decade. For many years, cytotoxic chemotherapy with docetaxel was the common form of treatment for patients with symptomatic or rapidly progressing disease. Since the approval of docetaxel, five additional therapeutic agents showing a survival benefit have been approved by the FDA in clinical trials. These include enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate, two agents designed specifically to affect the androgen axis; sipuleucel-T, which stimulates the immune system; cabazitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent; alpharadin (or radium Ra 223 dichloride), an alpha particle-emitting radioactive therapeutic agent; and the new generation antiandrogen agent enzalutamide.

Another recent success in CRPC is the improvement of understanding biologics and molecular drivers of prostate cancer growth and progression. These advances in the past few years have resulted in the investigations of several novel targeted therapies, including androgen receptor (AR) targeting agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), antiangiogenic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, anti-apoptotic protein inhibitors and proteasome inhibitors. Several of these drugs have either received approval from the FDA or have late stage development based on improvement of intermediate surrogate endpoints such as PSA levels or circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts in recent clinical trials.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2020

The Promise of Immunotherapy in the Management of Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma (CSCC): What Managed Care Needs to Know

Cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma (CSCC) is the second-most common cancer of the skin, usually occurring in areas exposed to the sun. Sunlight exposure and immunosuppression are the main risk factors for CSCC, with chronic sun exposure being the strongest environmental risk factor. Approximately 2.2 million people have CSCC at any given time and it makes up around 20% of all skin cancer cases. While prognosis is usually good, if distant spread occurs five-year survival is approximately 34%. In 2016, it resulted in about 51,900 deaths globally. Current treatment response rates in patients with CSCC are suboptimal, with a minority of patients experiencing complete or partial response with present pharmacologic treatment options. Moreover, surgeries to remove tumors can be disfiguring, and elderly patients often are not candidates for chemotherapeutic agents because they cannot tolerate the toxicities.

Fortunately, novel immunotherapies including PD-1 inhibitors, have shown improved safety and efficacy for patients with metastatic disease. These treatments have recently become available and are providing clinicians alternative options to improve both outcomes and quality of life in patients with advanced CSCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2020

A Deeper Look into Immunotherapies in the Management of Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma (CSCC): Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second-most common cancer of the skin, usually occurring in areas exposed to the sun. Sunlight exposure and immunosuppression are the main risk factors for cSCC, with chronic sun exposure being the strongest environmental risk factor. Approximately 2.2 million people have cSCC at any given time and it makes up around 20% of all skin cancer cases. While prognosis is usually good, if distant spread occurs five-year survival is approximately 34%. In 2016, it resulted in about 51,900 deaths globally. Current treatment response rates in patients with cSCC are suboptimal, with a minority of patients experiencing complete or partial response with present pharmacologic treatment options. Moreover, surgeries to remove tumors can be disfiguring, and elderly patients often are not candidates for chemotherapeutic agents because they cannot tolerate the toxicities.
Fortunately, novel immunotherapies including PD-1 inhibitors, have shown improved safety and efficacy for patients with metastatic disease. These treatments have recently become available and are providing clinicians alternative options to improve both outcomes and quality of life in patients with advanced cSCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2020

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Advanced CSCC: Anticipating and Managing Adverse Events

Cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma (CSCC) is the second-most common cancer of the skin, usually occurring in areas exposed to the sun. Sunlight exposure and immunosuppression are the main risk factors for CSCC, with chronic sun exposure being the strongest environmental risk factor. Approximately 2.2 million people have CSCC at any given time and it makes up around 20% of all skin cancer cases. While prognosis is usually good, if distant spread occurs five-year survival is approximately 34%. In 2016, it resulted in about 51,900 deaths globally. Current treatment response rates in patients with CSCC are suboptimal, with a minority of patients experiencing complete or partial response with present pharmacologic treatment options. Moreover, surgeries to remove tumors can be disfiguring, and elderly patients often are not candidates for chemotherapeutic agents because they cannot tolerate the toxicities.
Fortunately, novel immunotherapies including PD-1 inhibitors, have shown improved safety and efficacy for patients with metastatic disease. These treatments have recently become available and are providing clinicians alternative options to improve both outcomes and quality of life in patients with advanced CSCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2020

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Advanced CSCC: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunotherapies?

Cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma (CSCC) is the second-most common cancer of the skin, usually occurring in areas exposed to the sun. Sunlight exposure and immunosuppression are the main risk factors for CSCC, with chronic sun exposure being the strongest environmental risk factor. Approximately 2.2 million people have CSCC at any given time and it makes up around 20% of all skin cancer cases. While prognosis is usually good, if distant spread occurs five-year survival is approximately 34%. In 2016, it resulted in about 51,900 deaths globally. Current treatment response rates in patients with CSCC are suboptimal, with a minority of patients experiencing complete or partial response with present pharmacologic treatment options. Moreover, surgeries to remove tumors can be disfiguring, and elderly patients often are not candidates for chemotherapeutic agents because they cannot tolerate the toxicities.
Fortunately, novel immunotherapies including PD-1 inhibitors, have shown improved safety and efficacy for patients with metastatic disease. These treatments have recently become available and are providing clinicians alternative options to improve both outcomes and quality of life in patients with advanced CSCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2020

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