Oncology


PARP Inhibition and its Evolving Use in the Treatment of Cancers: What Managed Care Needs to Know for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

A new class of targeted agents known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown improved efficacy and are leading the way in the treatment of breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In addition, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy. This enzyme, known as PARP, is a critical component of DNA base excision repair, essential for the repair of single-strand breaks in DNA. If the action of PARP is inhibited in a normal cell, these breaks are converted to double-strand breaks and repaired through the process of homologous recombination. However, in cells with pre-existing defects in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, such as in cancer cells harboring BRCA1/2 mutations, inhibition of PARP results in synthetic lethality. Exploitation of this deficiency with PARP inhibitors create a therapeutic opportunity for tumor cell-specific cell killing. Challenges associated with maximizing therapeutic outcomes with potential PARP inhibitor use in several cancers include selection of optimal testing strategies to personalize care, management of treatment toxicities, and development of evidence-based sequencing and combination strategies.

This multi-part program will provide medical directors, practicing physicians and nurses with the latest clinical data on novel treatments that have recently completed late stage clinical trials. Attendees will be updated on these treatment options and the potential integration of newer agents, in order to optimize the care of their patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in PARP Inhibitors: What Does Managed Care Need to Know?

A new class of targeted agents known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown improved efficacy and are leading the way in the treatment of breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In addition, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy. This enzyme, known as PARP, is a critical component of DNA base excision repair, essential for the repair of single-strand breaks in DNA. If the action of PARP is inhibited in a normal cell, these breaks are converted to double-strand breaks and repaired through the process of homologous recombination. However, in cells with pre-existing defects in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, such as in cancer cells harboring BRCA1/2 mutations, inhibition of PARP results in synthetic lethality. Exploitation of this deficiency with PARP inhibitors create a therapeutic opportunity for tumor cell-specific cell killing. Challenges associated with maximizing therapeutic outcomes with potential PARP inhibitor use in several cancers include selection of optimal testing strategies to personalize care, management of treatment toxicities, and development of evidence-based sequencing and combination strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

A Deeper Look into PARP Inhibitors in the Management of Ovarian, Breast and Prostate Cancers: Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

A new class of targeted agents known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown improved efficacy and are leading the way in the treatment of breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In addition, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy. This enzyme, known as PARP, is a critical component of DNA base excision repair, essential for the repair of single-strand breaks in DNA. If the action of PARP is inhibited in a normal cell, these breaks are converted to double-strand breaks and repaired through the process of homologous recombination. However, in cells with pre-existing defects in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, such as in cancer cells harboring BRCA1/2 mutations, inhibition of PARP results in synthetic lethality. Exploitation of this deficiency with PARP inhibitors create a therapeutic opportunity for tumor cell-specific cell killing. Challenges associated with maximizing therapeutic outcomes with potential PARP inhibitor use in several cancers include selection of optimal testing strategies to personalize care, management of treatment toxicities, and development of evidence-based sequencing and combination strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Managing Cancers with PARP Inhibitors: Strategies for Anticipating, Recognizing, and Managing Adverse Events

A new class of targeted agents known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown improved efficacy and are leading the way in the treatment of breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In addition, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy. This enzyme, known as PARP, is a critical component of DNA base excision repair, essential for the repair of single-strand breaks in DNA. If the action of PARP is inhibited in a normal cell, these breaks are converted to double-strand breaks and repaired through the process of homologous recombination. However, in cells with pre-existing defects in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, such as in cancer cells harboring BRCA1/2 mutations, inhibition of PARP results in synthetic lethality. Exploitation of this deficiency with PARP inhibitors create a therapeutic opportunity for tumor cell-specific cell killing. Challenges associated with maximizing therapeutic outcomes with potential PARP inhibitor use in several cancers include selection of optimal testing strategies to personalize care, management of treatment toxicities, and development of evidence-based sequencing and combination strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

Optimizing Treatment Strategies in the Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Individualized Therapy for Improved Patient Outcomes

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there will be an estimated 155,870 deaths from lung cancer in 2018, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. As more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets, especially around EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer.

Molecular testing has now become a critical part of selecting treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC. Nearly two-thirds of NSCLC patients who are EGFR mutation-positive and experience disease progression after being treated with an EGFR-TKI develop a T790M resistance mutation, for which there have been limited treatment options. However, new indications and agents are now becoming available for patients with EGFR-TKI that has a T790M resistance mutation. Additionally, the first-line management of advanced EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC has begun to change with new indications bringing more options to the table. As non-small cell lung cancer therapies and treatments continue to both grow and change, it is imperative that we provide healthcare professionals across all spectrums updated information about both NSCLC itself and the treatment options that can greatly improve a patient’s quality of life and prognosis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

Integrating New and Emerging Therapies into the Treatment Paradigm in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): Expert Strategies for Improved Patient Outcomes

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the United States. In 2017, it was expected that liver cancer accounted for approximately 788,000 deaths globally, making it the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The prevalence and mortality rate of liver cancer has been rising steadily over the past decade. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. For the treatment of HCC, transplantation is an option for patients, however, there is a limited supply of good-quality deceased donor organs. Thus, other treatments, including systemic therapy, should be used to bridge patients to transplant or to delay recurrence if possible in unresectable HCC.

Fortunately, clinicians have been equipped with new individualized options in the past year, including targeted therapies, which provide options for the unmet need of treatment in HCC, especially beyond first-line therapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) options have shown improved efficacy and safety in HCC, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these options, how they should be integrated into the treatment paradigm, and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer: Expert Strategies for Individualized Treatment

Regardless of race or ethnicity, Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women. Athough death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years, patients in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, are less likely to survive. Therefore, therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. Treatment is also increasingly personalized, thanks to an array of molecularly targeted/endocrine therapies indicated for recurrent/advanced disease. New classes of targeted agents have been recently introduced or are in development for advanced breast cancer, including PARP inhibitors. With these options becoming available for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, it is critical to provide medical professionals with updated clinical data and strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2020

Evolving Treatment Strategies in the Management of Metastatic Melanoma: Expert Perspectives in Immunotherapy

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It occurs in skins cells called melanocytes, and while it is predominantly found in the skin, it can occur in any area of the body that contains melanocytes. Melanoma will be found in approximately 73,870 people in the United States in 2018 according to the National Cancer Institute. While it is the least common amongst skin cancers, it is by far the most deadly, with 9,940 people expected to die in 2018. Both of those numbers have been rising in recent years. In the early stages of melanoma, prognosis is usually good for patients, but when the melanoma becomes metastatic and spreads to other areas of the body, prognosis is especially poor.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 31, 2020

New Horizons in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Novel Therapies

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder characterized by sickle-shaped red blood cells. It is a chronic, life-long, debilitating disease with many forms that can range in clinical severity from asymptomatic to life-threatening. In the US, SCD affects an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 Americans. Acute sickle cell pain crises, also referred to as vaso-occlusive crises, are a common painful complication of the disease and the main reason that patients seek medical care in hospitals. Currently, treatment options are limited. Several novel therapies are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review for SCD which will likely dramatically change the treatment paradigm. This webinar program on integrating emerging therapies into the treatment paradigm will address these novel treatment options, emerging value equations, the limitations of current treatment options, and recent clinical research on new agents to optimize the management of patients with SCD.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 31, 2020

Evolving Considerations in the Treatment of Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC): A Closer Look at the Role of Immunotherapy

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of tumors that originate in the lip/oral cavity, hypopharynx, oropharynx, nasopharynx, and larynx. An estimated 48,330 new cases are diagnosed annually in the US, and 9,570 people die of the disease. HNSCC historically has been associated with tobacco and alcohol use; however, during the past decade, infection with HPV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a growing subset of HNSCCs. Despite advances and innovations in past years, the prognosis for metastatic disease remains poor. Fortunately for patients with metastatic HNSCC, new immunotherapeutic options, which have shown improved efficacy and safety, have recently become available to give clinicians and managed care professionals more options when managing a population of metastatic HNSCC patients. This enduring webcast session will provide attendees with the latest information on immunotherapies, disease progression, adverse events and what managed care needs to know.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2020

Patient-Focused Treatment Decisions in Metastatic Bladder Cancer: A Closer Look at the Integration of Immunotherapy

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. As the role of the immune system in oncogenesis and therapy has become clearer across cancer types, new approaches emerged with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer. In particular, immune checkpoint inhibitors such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors have changed the treatment paradigm. Checkpoint inhibitors have shown activity in patients with metastatic bladder cancer in both the second-line and the first-line settings. By preventing the interaction between PD-L1 and PD-1, all of these new options can allow the immune system to be more active against tumor cells. As immune checkpoint blockade inhibitors in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer have demonstrated significant enhancements to clinical outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2019

New Agents and Emerging Strategies in Advanced Breast Cancer: Patient-Centric Navigation in the Age of Personalized Care

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity with incidence in the United States being 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). Although death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years, cure becomes less likely in patients with distant metastases. Therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (mBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Nearly 80% of patients with advanced breast cancer have the HER2-negative subtype and therefore are not candidates for HER2-targeting therapies. Therapy for advanced breast cancer is increasingly personalized, thanks to an array of molecularly targeted/endocrine therapies indicated for recurrent/advanced disease. New classes of targeted agents have been recently introduced or are in development, including PARP inhibitors. The complexities of today’s more personalized care pose multiple challenges to effective clinical and economic management of the disease.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2019

Personalized Treatment Strategies in the Management of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC)

Colorectal cancer is the development of cancer from the colon or rectum (parts of the large intestine) and is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. Colorectal cancer, when discovered early, is highly treatable however, when the disease has metastasized, treatment and management become much more difficult. Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 70% for regional metastases and 13% for distant metastases. The prognosis of patients with mCRC has significantly improved in recent years with the introduction of inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways. Patients with stage one cancer typically have surgery as the main or first treatment while those with mCRC are treated with chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, both alone and in combination.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2019

Effective Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV): Appropriate
Treatment for Improved Outcomes

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a condition in which patients become physically ill following the administration of chemotherapy drugs and is one of the most feared side effects of chemotherapy treatments. Patients who suffer from acute CINV typically experience symptoms within the first 24 hours following treatment while delayed CINV usually occurs within 24 to 72 hours after chemotherapy and can potentially last for several days. Risk factors for this condition fall into patient-specific and therapy-specific categories thus the treatment of CINV can vary depending on the patient’s response to the therapy introduced after chemotherapy. Utilizing an appropriate degree of prophylaxis for the first cycle of chemotherapy is critical to prevent breakthrough CINV, which is difficult to manage and can lead to later anticipatory vomiting during subsequent cycles of therapy. The goal of selecting optimal antiemetic therapy continues to be based on the patient’s individualized treatment plans with the emergence of newer agents and patient-related risk factors, as well as the rapid evolution of guidelines for the management of CINV. Optimizing antiemetic usage requires awareness of available and emerging agents, as well as of the unique characteristics of these therapies that affect their role in CINV management. Because antiemetic medication has such a high success rate, chemotherapy patients no longer have to accept nausea, vomiting, and a decreased quality of life as an automatic consequence of treating cancer.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2019

The Value of Personalized Treatment Sequencing for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. CRPC occurs when patients’ disease progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone. Recently updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, biomarkers and appropriate patient selection criteria in patients with CRPC have been produced and are being used to better treat the disease. The measurement of PSA level has also recently improved the diagnosis of prostate cancer and is used to monitor for disease recurrence. If the level of PSA is a high value, the more likely is the existence of this tumor. Since the approval of docetaxel, five additional therapeutic agents showing a survival benefit have been approved by the FDA in clinical trials. These include enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate, two agents designed specifically to affect the androgen axis; sipuleucel-T, which stimulates the immune system; cabazitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent; alpharadin (or radium Ra 223 dichloride), an alpha particle-emitting radioactive therapeutic agent; and the new generation antiandrogen agent enzalutamide. These agents have been tested in multiple disease stages of prostate cancer to determine whether or when patients might benefit from each treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 10, 2019

Best Practices in the Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Individualizing Therapy for Optimized Patient Outcomes

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and is by far the leading cause of cancer death among men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, and despite progress in early detection and treatment, prognosis is poor. Historically, treatment has included a variety of modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. More recently, therapeutic options for NSCLC have evolved to include targeted agents to individualize treatment for patients with advanced disease. This includes treatment options for patients with EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC. and these options may help increase prognosis and quality of life in NSCLC patients. Molecular testing has now become a critical part of selecting treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC. Nearly two-thirds of NSCLC patients who are EGFR mutation-positive and experience disease progression after being treated with an EGFR-TKI develop a T790M resistance mutation, for which there have been limited treatment options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 31, 2019

Advances in the Management of Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC): A Closer Look at the Integration of Immunotherapy

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) affects the mouth, throat, and nasal cavity. The prognosis is fatal once the cancer metastasizes, giving patients, on average, about 5 years to survive. Symptoms may range from mouth ulcers, bleeding or pain the mouth, chronic sinus congestion, sore throat, pain when swallowing, and difficult breathing. Thankfully novel treatments in immunotherapies have proven efficacious, providing an increased survival rate and improved quality of life for patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 30, 2019

Novel Treatment Strategies in the Management of Ovarian Cancer: A Closer Look at the Role of PARP Inhibitors

According to the National Cancer Institute, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) there will be an estimated 22,440 new cases of ovarian cancer this year in the United States. The five-year survival rate is approximately 45%, leading to an estimated 14,080 deaths in the US. Ovarian cancer is usually found in stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen. This is due in large part to a lack of symptoms during the earlier stages. The treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving medical directors and clinicians more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer. Challenges associated with maximizing therapeutic outcomes with potential PARP inhibitor use in ovarian cancer include selection of optimal testing strategies to personalize care, management of treatment toxicities, and development of evidence-based sequencing and combination strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 30, 2019

New Frontiers in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): Exploring Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the United States. The prevalence and mortality rate of liver cancer has been rising steadily over the past decade and is still increasing as death rates are rising faster than any other type of cancer. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately, new agents have become available for the first time in almost 10 years, including targeted therapies such as Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs). These regimens have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in patients with disease progression and may fulfill the unmet need of treatment, particularly beyond first-line setting.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2019

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Lymphoma: Novel Therapies for Improved Patient Outcomes

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common subtype of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the Western Hemisphere. No sex preponderance is seen for follicular lymphomas, but the incidence increases with age and varies across racial groups. With current therapy options, prognosis is favorable, with median overall survival (OS) exceeding 12 years. There are various treatment options for FL based on the severity of associated symptoms and the rate of cancer growth. Active treatment is started if the patient begins to develop lymphoma-related symptoms or there are signs that the disease is progressing based on testing during follow- up visits. After treatment, many patients can go into a remission that lasts for years; however, this disease should be considered a lifelong condition as relapsed disease can occur. Recent advances in disease management and our understanding of the biology of FL have led to a dramatic change in the treatment landscape. Despite this progress, FL remains incurable with standard therapies but fortunately for patients with FL, several new agents have become available in the past year, including targeted therapy. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in patients with relapsed disease that have had other therapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 30, 2019

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, responsible for approximately 90–95% of cases. The prognosis for any treated renal cell cancer patient with progressing, recurring, or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage and almost all patients with advanced renal cell cancer are incurable. Fortunately, emerging treatment options, including targeted therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), are being integrated into the advanced RCC treatment paradigm. These newer options individualize therapy for patients with advanced RCC who have progressed on prior therapies, ultimately improving patient outcomes and quality of life. However, the question and selection of further treatment depends on many factors, including previous treatment and site of recurrence, as well as individual patient considerations. In addition, clinicians must analyze and apply evidence-based data and implement updated strategies to manage side effects of newer agents in order to select an appropriate treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 30, 2019

Challenges and Strategies in an Evolving Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Treatment Paradigm: What Does Managed Care Need to Know

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow and is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments, including targeted therapies, have recently become available, giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 30, 2019

Novel Insights on the Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC)

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States (US) and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Screening for CRPC requires measuring PSA levels which are the most common biomarker for prostate cancer. High PSA values indicate an increased probability of the tumor existing. Fortunately, the treatment paradigm has dramatically changed over the past decade with emerging therapies that have shown to improve patient outcomes, survival, and quality of life. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy remain the mainstay of treatment in the first and second line setting while recent advances are being used to better treat the disease, at all stages. Updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and biomarkers, based on appropriate patient selection criteria, are revolutionizing the way clinicians treat and manage CRPC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 30, 2019

Overcoming Real World Challenges in the Management of Metastatic Bladder Cancer: How Advances in Immunotherapy are Improving Patient Outcomes

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Long-term survival for patients diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer is poor, with only 5% of patients surviving for 5 years or more. Due to the role of the immune system in oncogenesis, therapy has become clearer across cancer types, and new approaches are emerging with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer. In particular, immune checkpoint inhibitors such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors are changing the treatment paradigm. Checkpoint inhibitors have shown efficacy in patients with metastatic bladder cancer in both the second-line setting and the first-line settings. These inhibitors target proteins that are expressed at high levels on some cancer cells, while others target immune cells. All of these new options allow the immune system to be more active against tumor cells. As immune checkpoint blockade inhibitors in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer have demonstrated significant enhancements to clinical outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 31, 2019

Patient Focused Treatment Decisions in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC): A Closer Look at the Role of Biomarkers in Optimizing Outcomes

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the development of cancer from the colon or rectum and has the ability to metastasize to other parts of the body. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. In 2017, it is expected that there will be 134,490 new cases of CRC and 49,190 deaths. CRC is highly treatable when discovered early however metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis with only a 5-year survival rate. Fortunately diagnosing CRC has significantly improved in recent years with the introduction of new therapies which are largely based on the stage of the disease, patient medical history and preferences, predictive biomarkers and other factors. Surgery is typically the main treatment in the first line setting however other therapies are needed to effectively treat patients with mCRC to include chemotherapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapy; both alone and in combination. These options have shown improved efficacy and safety in mCRC and should be integrated into the treatment paradigm. Additionally, treating adverse effects and comorbidities are just as critical to successfully managing the disease, improve patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 31, 2019

Informed Decision Making in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Expert Strategies for Individualized Treatment

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, and despite progress in early detection and treatment, prognosis is poor. Historically, treatment has included a variety of modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. The recent use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. As more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. These recently approved agents could help increase prognosis and quality of life in NSCLC patients. In addition, guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) have been updated to incorporate a section on maintenance therapy in the management of advanced NSCLC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 31, 2019

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