Oncology


A New Era in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Integrating Personalized Therapies to Optimize Outcomes

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 248,530 new cases diagnosed last year. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Advances in the past few years have resulted in the investigations of several novel targeted therapies, including androgen receptor inhibitor (ARI) targeting agents, antineoplastic agent and gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), antiangiogenic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, anti-apoptotic protein inhibitor, and PARP inhibitors.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Managed Care Considerations in the Treatment and Management of Ovarian Cancer: Expert Strategies on the Evolving Role of PARP Inhibitors

There were an estimated 19,880 new cases of ovarian cancer last year in the United States, and an estimated 12,810 deaths due to ovarian cancer in the US, according to the American Cancer Society. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. This is due in large part to a lack of symptoms during the earlier stages. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving medical directors and clinicians more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer. Additionally, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy. It is important for medical directors, oncologists, and nurses who manage ovarian cancer patient populations to have a solid understanding of the mechanistic rationale for the use of these medications in order to optimize their therapeutic application.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers, and during 2021, it was expected that there were about 228,820 new cases of lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there were an estimated 135,720 deaths from lung cancer in 2021, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. As more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets, especially around EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) need to be aware of information regarding tumor-specific diagnosis, expanding treatment options, and supporting data to maximize the care of their patients. Additionally, more agents have recently become available for patients with exon 20 EGFR-positive NSCLC and these options could help increase prognosis and quality of life in NSCLC patients. With so many effective treatment options becoming available, it is critical to inform medical directors, oncologists and nurses about these agents, and strategies to effectively manage NSCLC patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Keeping Pace with Rapid Advancements in the Treatment and Management of Multiple Myeloma

Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 10% of hematologic malignancies. In 2023, it is estimated that MM will be responsible for 12,590 new deaths and 35,730 new cases. Multiple myeloma is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable. It is potentially curable when it presents as a solitary plasmacytoma of bone or as an extramedullary plasmacytoma. The median survival in the prechemotherapy era was about 7 months. After the introduction of chemotherapy, prognosis improved significantly with a median survival of 24 months to 30 months and a 10-year survival of 3%. There are several novel options for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes, including options that have recently completed or are undergoing clinical trials. It is important that medical directors, oncologists, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date on these new and emerging therapies and how these options can be integrated into evolving treatment paradigms in the management of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Informed Managed Care Decision-Making in the Management of HER2-Negative Breast Cancer: Optimizing the Impact of Targeted Therapy for Improved Outcomes

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the American Cancer Society, there were an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer in women in the United States during 2022. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 46,600 women were expected to die from breast cancer last year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Fortunately for patients with both early and advanced breast cancer, several new agents, including PARP inhibitors, have recently become available. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes. With these options becoming available for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, it is critical to provide medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and others on the interprofessional management team with updated clinical data and strategies on the changing treatment paradigm, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Implementing New Data and Evolving Standards in HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: Applying the Latest Evidence to Improve Outcomes

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the American Cancer Society, there were an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer in women in the United States during 2022. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 46,600 women were expected to die from breast cancer last year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely, and few patients are rendered free of disease. Treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Fortunately for patients with advanced breast cancer, several new agents, including antibody-drug conjugates, have recently been approved, especially in HER2-positive disease. Additionally, ADCs have shown the ability to improve outcomes in patients with HER2-low advanced breast cancer. With these now available for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, it is critical to provide medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and others on the interprofessional management team with updated clinical data and strategies on these new therapies the changing treatment paradigm, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Endometrial Cancer: Leveraging Immunotherapy for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Cancer of the uterine corpus, also called endometrial cancer (EC), is the most common cancer of the female genital tract, with an estimated 65,950 new cases diagnosed and 12,550 deaths annually in the United States. The mortality rate has increased approximately 1% each year from 2015 to 2019, an increase which may be related to a higher rate of advanced-stage cancers, high-risk histologies, and patients being diagnosed at an older age. There are significant disparities between White and Black women regarding rates of early-stage diagnosis (75% vs 62%) and 5-year relative survival (84% vs 63%). When patients are diagnosed with distant-stage disease, 5-year relative survival rates plummet to 18% for all races. Early identification of high-risk patients and personalized treatment approaches for this complex, multifaceted disease are needed to improve outcomes. Fortunately for patients with endometrial cancer, new and emerging therapies, including immune based therapies such as PD-1 Inhibitors, having recently been approved, giving managed care professionals and clinicians more options for treating this patient population. With so many new therapies entering the treatment paradigm knowledge gaps have been created, making imperative that managed care physician medical directors, oncologists, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals who manage EC patient populations have a solid understanding of these options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application, for optimized clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Informed Managed Care Decision-Making in the Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for roughly 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages. The American Cancer Society estimates that there were approximately 20,050 new cases of AML and 11,540 deaths from AML in the United States in 2022. The five-year survival rate has not improved in older patients despite 40 years of research. Fortunately for patients with AML, many new treatments have recently been approved for use. These options, which are among the first new treatments in AML since 1990, have drastically changed the treatment paradigm. With that change comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and nurses. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the AML patient population.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Innovative Approaches in the Management of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2022, it is expected that there were 20,160 new cases of CLL and about 4,410 deaths, which represents an increase in both numbers. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. New combination regimens have recently become available that have shown the ability to greatly improve outcomes in previously untreated CLL. This activity focuses on these evolving options, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities. With the availability of new treatments, it is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging combination options, guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

New Insights into the Management of Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Expert Strategies and Treatment Considerations for Managed Care

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, there were an estimated 82,290 new cases of bladder cancer and 17,100 deaths in the United States in 2022. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. As the role of the immune system in oncogenesis and therapy has become clearer across cancer types, new approaches emerged with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer, which led to the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, when those options fail, and when patients are ineligible for cisplatin-containing chemotherapy, options are sparse to manage this difficult disease. Fortunately for patients with metastatic bladder cancer, new agents, including antibody-drug conjugates both alone and in combination with immunotherapies, have recently emerged for patients with metastatic bladder cancer, especially in patients who are ineligible for cisplatin-containing chemotherapy. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be educated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the metastatic bladder cancer patient population.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Incorporating the Latest Treatment Changes in Prostate Cancer: Applying the Latest Evidence to Improve Outcomes

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States (US) and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 248,530 new cases diagnosed last year. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. About 40 percent of these patients have prostate cancer that is also associated with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level that has not spread to other parts of the body. The danger that can occur, if not caught early, is that 33% of those men could have the cancer spread to other parts of the body. The treatment of prostate cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade. For many years, cytotoxic chemotherapy with docetaxel was the common form of treatment in patients with symptomatic or rapidly progressing disease, but the recent availability of emerging therapies for prostate cancer has provided medical directors and physicians with different studies on how to demonstrate improved survival with a variety of advanced therapeutic agents. Since the approval of docetaxel, five additional therapeutic agents showing a survival benefit have been approved by the FDA in clinical trials. These include enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate, two agents designed specifically to affect the androgen axis; sipuleucel-T, which stimulates the immune system; cabazitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent; alpharadin (or radium Ra 223 dichloride), an alpha particle-emitting radioactive therapeutic agent; and the new generation antiandrogen agent enzalutamide. These agents have been tested in multiple disease stages of prostate cancer to determine whether or when patients might benefit from each treatment.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

What Managed Care Needs to Know About the Evolving CLL Landscape: Optimized Decision Making Around BTK Inhibitors and Their Combination

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2022, it is expected that there were 20,160 new cases of CLL and about 4,410 deaths, which represents an increase in both numbers. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. Additionally, combination options with BTK inhibitors are undergoing late stage clinical trials and regulatory review, giving even more options for patients with CLL. This activity focuses on these evolving options, and their combinations, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities. With the availability of new treatments, it is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options, guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2025

Improving Patient Access and Adherence in CLL: Strategies for Anticipating, Recognizing, and Managing Adverse Events in BTK Inhibitors and
Combination Therapy

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2022, it is expected that there were 20,160 new cases of CLL and about 4,410 deaths, which represents an increase in both numbers. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. Additionally, combination options with BTK inhibitors are undergoing late stage clinical trials and regulatory review, giving even more options for patients with CLL. This activity focuses on these evolving options, and their combinations, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities. With the availability of new treatments, it is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options, guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2025

Implementing New Data and Evolving Standards in CLL: Expert Strategies on the Evolving Role of BTK Inhibitors and Combination Therapy

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2022, it is expected that there were 20,160 new cases of CLL and about 4,410 deaths, which represents an increase in both numbers. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. Additionally, combination options with BTK inhibitors are undergoing late stage clinical trials and regulatory review, giving even more options for patients with CLL. This activity focuses on these evolving options, and their combinations, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities. With the availability of new treatments, it is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options, guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2025

Informed Managed Care Decision-Making in the Treatment and Management of Ovarian Cancer: Optimizing the Impact of PARP Inhibitors for Improved Outcomes

There were an estimated 19,880 new cases of ovarian cancer last year in the United States, and an estimated 12,8110 deaths due to ovarian cancer in the US, according to the American Cancer Society. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. This is due in large part to a lack of symptoms during the earlier stages. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving medical directors and clinicians more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer. Additionally, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in the first-line setting. It is important for medical directors, oncologists, and nurses who manage ovarian cancer patient populations to have a solid understanding of the mechanistic rationale for the use of these medications in order to optimize their therapeutic application.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Optimizing Outcomes in the Management of Multiple Myeloma: Key Managed Care Considerations on the Evolving Role of Anti-CD38 Therapy

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable. The median survival in the prechemotherapy era was about 7 months however new and emerging treatment options are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials and have shown great outcomes and real-world data in their ability to improve clinical and economic outcomes. MM is staged by estimating the myeloma tumor cell mass on the basis of the amount of monoclonal (or myeloma) protein (M protein) in the serum and/or urine, along with various clinical parameters, such as the hemoglobin and serum calcium concentrations, amongst other factors. The stage of the disease at presentation is a strong determinant of survival, but it has little influence on the choice of therapy since almost all patients, except for rare patients with solitary bone tumors or extramedullary plasmacytomas, have generalized disease. Treatment selection is influenced by the age and general health of the patient, prior therapy, and the presence of complications of the disease. Treatment is directed at reducing the tumor cell burden and reversing any complications of disease, such as renal failure, infection, hyperviscosity, or hypercalcemia with appropriate medical management. MM remains a disease with poor long-term survival as it is currently incurable and all patients will eventually relapse, underlining the need for new therapies. This webcast activity will take a close look at the evolving role of anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies in the management of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Managed Care Considerations in the Treatment of HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: A Closer Look at Recent Advances for Improved Patient Outcomes

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the American Cancer Society, there were an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer in women in the United States during 2022. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 46,600 women were expected to die from breast cancer last year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely, and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Fortunately for patients with advanced breast cancer, several new agents, including small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), have recently been approved, especially in HER2-positive disease and brain metastases. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes in the approximately 40% of patients living with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. With these now available for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, it is critical to provide medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and others on the interprofessional management team with updated clinical data and strategies on these new therapies the changing treatment paradigm, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Emerging Data and Best Practices for the Use of Novel Therapies in Endometrial Cancer: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Cancer of the uterine corpus, also called endometrial cancer (EC), is the most common cancer of the female genital tract, with an estimated 65,950 new cases diagnosed and 12,550 deaths annually in the United States. The mortality rate has increased approximately 1% each year from 2015 to 2019, an increase which may be related to a higher rate of advanced-stage cancers, high-risk histologies, and patients being diagnosed at an older age. There are significant disparities between White and Black women regarding rates of early-stage diagnosis (75% vs 62%) and 5-year relative survival (84% vs 63%). When patients are diagnosed with distant-stage disease, 5-year relative survival rates plummet to 18% for all races. Early identification of high-risk patients and personalized treatment approaches for this complex, multifaceted disease are needed to improve outcomes. Fortunately for patients with endometrial cancer, new and emerging combination regimens, including immunotherapy and targeted therapy combinations, have been approved in recent years, giving managed care professionals and clinicians more options for treating this patient population. With so many new therapies entering the treatment paradigm, knowledge gaps have been created, making it imperative that managed care physician medical directors, oncologists, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals who manage EC patient populations have a solid understanding of these options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application, for optimized clinical and economic outcomes.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2022, it is expected that there were 20,160 new cases of CLL and about 4,410 deaths, which represents an increase in both numbers. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments, including BTK inhibitors, have recently become available giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. This activity focuses on these evolving treatments and strategies, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities. With the availability of new treatments, it is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options, guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Evolving Considerations in the Treatment and Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers, and during 2023, it is expected that there will be approximately 238,340 new cases of lung cancer. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there will be an estimated 127,070 deaths from lung cancer in 2023, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. As more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets, especially around KRAS mutation–positive NSCLC. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) need to be aware of information regarding tumor-specific diagnosis, expanding treatment options, and supporting data to maximize the care of their patients. Additionally, more agents have recently been approved for patients with KRAS mutation–positive NSCLC and these options have shown the ability to help increase prognosis and quality of life in NSCLC patients. With so many effective treatment options becoming available, it is critical to inform physician medical directors, oncologists and nurses about these agents, and strategies to effectively manage NSCLC patients.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Best Practices in the Treatment and Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): Managed Care Decision Making in an Evolving Landscape

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for roughly 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages. The American Cancer Society estimates that there were approximately 20,050 new cases of AML and 11,540 deaths from AML in the United States in 2022. The five-year survival rate has not improved in older patients despite 40 years of research. Fortunately for patients with AML, many new treatments are now here. New options, which have the ability to target certain types of mutations, have been approved in AML for the first time since 1990. With so many new options becoming available in the past few years, the treatment paradigm in AML, especially in relapsed or refractory and high-risk disease and in maintenance settings, has drastically changed. With that change comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and nurses. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the AML patient population.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

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