Oncology


Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Expert Perspectives on the Evolving Role of Immunotherapy

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers, and during 2020, it was expected that there were about 222,500 new cases of lung cancer. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there were an estimated 155,870 deaths from lung cancer in 2020, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. Recent clinical data have demonstrated that NSCLC is a very heterogeneous disease. However, as more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Fortunately for patients with metastatic NSCLC, immune checkpoint inhibitors have become available in recent years, with more coming soon, that have showed improved efficacy, safety and outcomes, especially in patients with high levels of PD-L1 expression.

As more immunotherapies are becoming available, the treatment paradigm has grown expansive, making it difficult for clinicians and managed care professionals to make the appropriate decisions based on recent clinical data and guidelines. In this program on NSCLC, medical directors, oncologists, and nurses will learn about the optimal use of current and emerging immunotherapy treatment options and new options that are just becoming available, ultimately helping patients achieve a greater quality of life and improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2023

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung
Cancer (NSCLC): Expert Perspectives on the Evolving Role of Immunotherapy

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers, and during 2020, it was expected that there were about 222,500 new cases of lung cancer. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there were an estimated 155,870 deaths from lung cancer in 2020, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. Recent clinical data have demonstrated that NSCLC is a very heterogeneous disease. However, as more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Fortunately for patients with metastatic NSCLC, immune checkpoint inhibitors have become available in recent years, with more coming soon, that have showed improved efficacy, safety and outcomes, especially in patients with high levels of PD-L1 expression.

As more immunotherapies are becoming available, the treatment paradigm has grown expansive, making it difficult for clinicians and managed care professionals to make the appropriate decisions based on recent clinical data and guidelines. In this program on NSCLC, medical directors, oncologists, and nurses will learn about the optimal use of current and emerging immunotherapy treatment options and new options that are just becoming available, ultimately helping patients achieve a greater quality of life and improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Managed Care Considerations on Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers, and during 2020, it was expected that there were about 222,500 new cases of lung cancer. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there were an estimated 155,870 deaths from lung cancer in 2020, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. Recent clinical data have demonstrated that NSCLC is a very heterogeneous disease. However, as more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Fortunately for patients with metastatic NSCLC, immune checkpoint inhibitors have become available in recent years, with more coming soon, that have showed improved efficacy, safety and outcomes, especially in patients with high levels of PD-L1 expression.

As more immunotherapies are becoming available, the treatment paradigm has grown expansive, making it difficult for clinicians and managed care professionals to make the appropriate decisions based on recent clinical data and guidelines. In this program on NSCLC, medical directors, oncologists, and nurses will learn about the optimal use of current and emerging immunotherapy treatment options and new options that are just becoming available, ultimately helping patients achieve a greater quality of life and improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2023

Leveraging Immunotherapy in Women’s Cancers: Expert Perspectives on Current Evidence and Practical Guidance in Cervical and Endometrial Cancers

Although cervical and endometrial cancers are associated with high rates of positive clinical outcomes when detected early enough, many cases are not detected until they have reached an advanced stage. The management of patients with advanced/metastatic disease remains an important clinical and economic challenge. Pursuit of treatment options that may help to improve clinical efficacy and limit treatment-associated adverse events is an active area of investigation, with several options showing promise in recent studies. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of these diseases has helped to inform new approaches to clinical management, which may improve outcomes for your patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2023

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Landscape in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It accounts for about 15% of all new cancers, and during 2020, it was expected that there were about 222,500 new cases of lung cancer. Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and there were an estimated 155,870 deaths from lung cancer in 2020, accounting for around 29% of all cancer deaths. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. Recent clinical data have demonstrated that NSCLC is a very heterogeneous disease. However, as more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Fortunately for patients with metastatic NSCLC, immune checkpoint inhibitors have become available in recent years, with more coming soon, that have showed improved efficacy, safety and outcomes, especially in patients with high levels of PD-L1 expression.

As more immunotherapies are becoming available, the treatment paradigm has grown expansive, making it difficult for clinicians and managed care professionals to make the appropriate decisions based on recent clinical data and guidelines. In this program on NSCLC, medical directors, oncologists, and nurses will learn about the optimal use of current and emerging immunotherapy treatment options and new options that are just becoming available, ultimately helping patients achieve a greater quality of life and improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Evolving Considerations in the Treatment and Management of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2021, it is expected that there will be 21,250 new cases of CLL and about 4,320 deaths, which represents an increase in both numbers. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. New combination regimens have recently become available that have shown the ability to greatly improve outcomes in previously untreated CLL. This activity focuses on these evolving options, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities. With the availability of new treatments, it is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging combination options, guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.

After chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out how far the cancer has spread in the blood and bone marrow. While generally considered incurable, CLL progresses slowly in most cases. CLL treatment focuses on controlling the disease and its symptoms. Initial CLL treatments vary depending on the exact diagnosis and the progression of the disease. Fortunately, clinicians have recently been equipped with more options, including targeted therapies, which individualize therapy for patients with CLL. Additionally, new combination regimens have recently become available that have shown the ability to greatly improve patient outcomes in previously untreated CLL. These new options have shown improved efficacy and safety in CLL, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these options and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option. As the rate at which clinical options for treatment of CLL expands, medical directors, practicing oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals providing care for patients with CLL are struggling to stay abreast of these advances. The Spring Managed Care Forum presentation on recent advances in targeted therapy combinations will address this gap in knowledge by providing attendees with updated treatment strategies, guidelines, and successful evidence-based treatment approaches from recent clinical data. With recently approved combination options, and options undergoing regulatory review soon to be entering the treatment paradigm, it is imperative to educate physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals on these treatments and strategies for patients who would benefit from targeted therapies, ultimately improving patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: Expert Strategies on the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer are to be diagnosed in women in the United States during 2021. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 46,600 women are expected to die from breast cancer this year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. HER2-positive breast cancer is a breast cancer that tests positive for a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). This protein promotes the growth of cancer cells. In about 1 of every 5 breast cancers, the cancer cells have extra copies of the gene that makes the HER2 protein. HER2-positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer. Additionally, in the later stages of HER2+ disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the HER2+ metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. Treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life.

Fortunately for patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer, several new agents have been recently approved. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes in the approximately 40% of patients living with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, clinicians are being challenged to quickly diagnose breast cancer and its corresponding stage, and provide the best evidenced-based treatment that is available for patients. Between 15% and 20% of breast cancers cases worldwide are HER2-positive subtypes and therefore are eligible for HER2-targeting therapies. Therapy for advanced breast cancer is increasingly personalized, thanks to an array of molecularly targeted/endocrine therapies indicated for recurrent/advanced disease. Fortunately for these patients, new options have recently been approved that have shown the ability to greatly improve outcomes in patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Patient-Focused Treatment Decisions in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Expert Strategies on New and Emerging Combinations

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a kidney cancer that originates in the lining of the proximal convoluted tubule, a part of the very small tubes in the kidney that transport waste molecules from the blood to the urine. RCC is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, responsible for approximately 90–95% of cases. In 2021, it is estimated that there will be approximately 76,080 new cases of kidney cancer, and about 13,780 people will die from the disease. Approximately 16% of patients with RCC will have metastases at diagnosis, and as many as 40% will demonstrate metastasis after primary surgical treatment for localized RCC. With a 5-year survival rate ranging from 5% to 12%, the prognosis for these patients is poor. Fortunately for patients with advanced RCC, many new treatments have recently become available or have completed clinical trials, especially in the area of immunotherapy combinations, giving clinicians new options to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. With so many new options becoming available for the healthcare community, clinicians and medical directors are struggling to stay abreast of all the changes in advanced RCC treatment, especially in the evolving area of immunotherapy and targeted therapy combinations. The prognosis for any treated renal cell cancer patient with progressing, recurring, or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage. Almost all patients with advanced renal cell cancer are incurable. The question and selection of further treatment depends on many factors, including if there has been any previous treatment and site of recurrence, as well as individual patient considerations. Fortunately, clinicians are being equipped with immune checkpoint inhibitors, both alone and in combination with targeted therapies, to integrate into the advanced RCC treatment paradigm, which individualize therapy for patients with advanced RCC, ultimately improving patient outcomes and quality of life. These new options, some of which have been approved in recent months, have shown improved efficacy and safety in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Best Practices in the Treatment and Management of Ovarian Cancer: An In-Depth Look at the Evolving Role of PARP Inhibitors

There will be an estimated 21,410 new cases of ovarian cancer this year in the United States, and an estimated 13,770 deaths due to ovarian cancer in the US, according to the American Cancer Society. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. This is due in large part to a lack of symptoms during the earlier stages. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving medical directors and clinicians more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer. Additionally, new indications for these targeted agents offer expanded options in the maintenance setting in varying lines of therapy. It is important for medical directors, oncologists, and nurses who manage ovarian cancer patient populations to have a solid understanding of the mechanistic rationale for the use of these medications in order to optimize their therapeutic application.

The enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a critical component of DNA base excision repair, essential for the repair of single-strand breaks in DNA. If the action of PARP is inhibited in a normal cell, these breaks are converted to double-strand breaks and repaired through the process of homologous recombination. However, in cells with pre-existing defects in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, such as in cancer cells harboring BRCA1/2 mutations, inhibition of PARP results in synthetic lethality. Exploitation of this deficiency with PARP inhibitors creates a therapeutic opportunity for tumor cell-specific cell killing. Challenges associated with maximizing therapeutic outcomes with potential PARP inhibitor use in ovarian cancer include selection of optimal testing strategies to personalize care, management of treatment toxicities, and development of evidence-based sequencing and combination strategies. With new indications for these newer treatments have been approved, including new indications, making the need for education extremely important. It is for this reason that we must educate healthcare professionals on the latest clinical data, updated guidelines, and management strategies to improve clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Advanced Treatment Strategies in Prostate Cancer: A Closer Look at the Current and Emerging Therapeutic Options

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States (US) and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 191,930 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. About 40 percent of these patients have prostate cancer that is also associated with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level that has not spread to other parts of the body. The danger that can occur, if not caught early, is that 33% of those men could have the cancer spread to other parts of the body.

Patients with all stages of prostate cancer have many treatment options available to them, from front-line therapy to second-line therapy and beyond with both immunotherapy and chemotherapy as current options. Recently updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, biomarkers and appropriate patient selection criteria in patients with prostate cancer have been produced and are being used to better treat the disease. The measurement of PSA level has also recently improved the diagnosis of prostate cancer, which is important because it helps identify patients who have prostate cancer and prevent undertreatment. This marker is used for early diagnosis and monitoring for disease recurrence. PSA is the most common biochemical marker for prostate cancer and is used as a screening tool, although it remains prostate specific and not necessarily prostate cancer specific.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Patient-Focused Treatment Decisions in Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC): A Closer Look at the Evolving Role of Immunotherapy

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that originate in the oral cavity, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, hypopharynx, oropharynx, nasopharynx, and larynx. It’s estimated that 48,000 new cases are diagnosed annually in the US, with a median age of onset at 60, and is more common in men than women. Historically HNSCC has been associated with tobacco and alcohol use, however, during the past decade, infection with HPV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a growing subset of HNSCCs. Despite advances and innovations in past years, the prognosis for metastatic disease remains poor. Fortunately, novel immunotherapies have recently become available and have shown improved efficacy, tolerability, and safety. Sequencing treatment depends on several factors, to include the stage of the disease, previous treatment, biomarkers, and patient co-morbidities. Combination therapy has also shown promising results however healthcare providers need to realize the implications of managing adverse events and patient adherence to prolong progression free and overall survival, as well as improve patient quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): Expert Perspectives for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for roughly 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages. The American Cancer Society estimates that there were approximately 19,940 new cases of AML and 11,180 deaths from AML in the United States in 2020. The five-year survival rate has not improved in older patients despite of 40 years of research. Fortunately for patients with AML, many new treatments have recently been approved for use. These options, which are among the first new treatments in AML since 1990, have begun to drastically change the treatment paradigm. With that change comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and nurses. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the AML patient population.

AML has several subtypes and treatment and prognosis vary among subtypes. After AML has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out the subtype. This is especially important, as several new treatments focus on AML disease with certain mutations or on patients who are unable to receive chemotherapy regimens. Following older treatment paradigms, AML has been cured in 35-40% of people under 60 years old, but only in 5-15% of people over 60 years old. Fortunately for people with AML, that treatment paradigm is set to change drastically, as novel targeted agents have shown improved efficacy and safety outcomes in clinical trial research. It is imperative that physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date regarding these new therapy options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Best Practices in the Treatment and Management of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Essential Strategies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer are to be diagnosed in women in the United States during 2020. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 46,600 women are expected to die from breast cancer this year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Fortunately for patients with advanced breast cancer, several new agents, including PARP inhibitors, have recently become available. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes. With these options becoming available for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, it is critical to provide medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and others on the interprofessional management team with updated clinical data and strategies on the changing treatment paradigm, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Evolving Considerations in the Treatment and Management of Metastatic Melanoma: Expert Strategies on Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It will be found in approximately 73,870 people in the US in 2020 according to the National Cancer Institute. While it is the least common amongst skin cancers, it is by far the most deadly, with 9,940 people expected to die in 2020. Both of those numbers have been rising in recent years. Fortunately for patients with metastatic melanoma, significant progress has been made in the treatment of this deadly disease over the past few years, especially in the area of immunotherapies. This webinar on recent advances in the treatment and management of metastatic melanoma will provide attendees with updated treatment strategies, guidelines, and successful evidence-based treatment approaches from recent clinical data.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL): Expert Perspectives on the Evolving Role of BTK Inhibitors and Combination Therapy is a three part webinar series

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2021, it is expected that there will be 20,720 new cases of CLL and about 3,930 deaths. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving healthcare professionals many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

A Closer Look at Recent Data and Guideline Updates in CLL: Expert Perspectives on the Evolving Role of BTK Inhibitors and Combination Therapy

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2021, it is expected that there will be 20,720 new cases of CLL and about 3,930 deaths. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving healthcare professionals many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in CLL: What Does Managed Care Need to Know About New and Emerging Combinations Therapies?

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2021, it is expected that there will be 20,720 new cases of CLL and about 3,930 deaths. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving healthcare professionals many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in CLL: Strategies for Anticipating, Recognizing, and Managing Adverse Events in BTK Inhibitors and Combination Therapy

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2021, it is expected that there will be 20,720 new cases of CLL and about 3,930 deaths. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving healthcare professionals many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

Clinical Advances in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Closer Look at the Role of PARP Inhibitors

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Fortunately for these patients, novel therapies have changed the treatment paradigm, as recent data has shown that newer options, including PARP inhibitors, greatly improves outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Prostate Cancer: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Current and Emerging PARP Inhibitors?

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Fortunately for these patients, novel therapies have changed the treatment paradigm, as recent data has shown that newer options, including PARP inhibitors, greatly improves outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

A Closer Look at Emerging PARP Inhibitors in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Recent Clinical Trial Data for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Fortunately for these patients, novel therapies have changed the treatment paradigm, as recent data has shown that newer options, including PARP inhibitors, greatly improves outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Prostate Cancer: Strategies for Managing Treatment Related Adverse Events Associated with PARP Inhibitor Regimens

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Fortunately for these patients, novel therapies have changed the treatment paradigm, as recent data has shown that newer options, including PARP inhibitors, greatly improves outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Recent Therapeutic Advances and Updates in the Management of MSI-H Colorectal Cancer: A Closer Look at the Evolving Role of Immunotherapy is a two-part webinar series

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the development of cancer from the colon or rectum, due to the abnormal growth of cells that have the ability to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Excluding skin cancers, CRC is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. In 2021, it is expected that there will be 149,500 new cases of colorectal cancer and 52,980 deaths. When discovered early, CRC is highly treatable. However, when the disease has spread, treatment becomes much more difficult. Fortunately, immunotherapy options have become available for patients with metastatic CRC, particular in MSI-High disease, giving clinicians and managed care professionals more options in managing this patient population.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in MSI-H Colorectal Cancer: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Recent Advances in Immunotherapy

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Fortunately for these patients, novel therapies have changed the treatment paradigm, as recent data has shown that newer options, including PARP inhibitors, greatly improves outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Recent Therapeutic Advances and Updates in the Management of MSI-H Colorectal Cancer: A Closer Look at the Evolving Role of Immunotherapy

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men in the US and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2020. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Fortunately for these patients, novel therapies have changed the treatment paradigm, as recent data has shown that newer options, including PARP inhibitors, greatly improves outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Recent Therapeutic Advances in the Management of Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Managed Care Perspectives on Immunotherapy in the First Line Setting is a three-part webinar series

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, there will be 80,470 new cases of bladder cancer and 17,670 deaths in the United States in 2020. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. As the role of the immune system in oncogenesis and therapy has become clearer across cancer types, new approaches emerged with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer, which led to the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, when those options fail, options are sparse to manage this difficult disease. Fortunately for patients with metastatic bladder cancer, new agents, including antibody-drug conjugates, have recently emerged for patients who have failed on immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be educated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the metastatic bladder cancer patient population.

While immunotherapy has revolutionized care for metastatic bladder cancer, it doesn’t work for everyone. Patients who progress with or fail immunotherapy will need subsequent therapy, and there is limited data to guide treatment selection. New data from late-stage clinical trials introduce emerging targeted agents with great promise in improving outcomes for these patients. As these options have recently become available and shown the ability to improve outcomes in patients with this difficult to treat disease, it is imperative that physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date regarding these novel treatments, so that they can properly approve and select therapy based on individual patient characteristics for improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

A Closer Look at Immunotherapy in the First Line Management of Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Maintenance Options for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, there will be 80,470 new cases of bladder cancer and 17,670 deaths in the United States in 2020. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. As the role of the immune system in oncogenesis and therapy has become clearer across cancer types, new approaches emerged with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer, which led to the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, when those options fail, options are sparse to manage this difficult disease. Fortunately for patients with metastatic bladder cancer, new agents, including antibody-drug conjugates, have recently emerged for patients who have failed on immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be educated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the metastatic bladder cancer patient population.

While immunotherapy has revolutionized care for metastatic bladder cancer, it doesn’t work for everyone. Patients who progress with or fail immunotherapy will need subsequent therapy, and there is limited data to guide treatment selection. New data from late-stage clinical trials introduce emerging targeted agents with great promise in improving outcomes for these patients. As these options have recently become available and shown the ability to improve outcomes in patients with this difficult to treat disease, it is imperative that physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date regarding these novel treatments, so that they can properly approve and select therapy based on individual patient characteristics for improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Metastatic Bladder Cancer: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Recent Advances in First Line Immunotherapy?

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, there will be 80,470 new cases of bladder cancer and 17,670 deaths in the United States in 2020. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. As the role of the immune system in oncogenesis and therapy has become clearer across cancer types, new approaches emerged with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer, which led to the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, when those options fail, options are sparse to manage this difficult disease. Fortunately for patients with metastatic bladder cancer, new agents, including antibody-drug conjugates, have recently emerged for patients who have failed on immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be educated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the metastatic bladder cancer patient population.

While immunotherapy has revolutionized care for metastatic bladder cancer, it doesn’t work for everyone. Patients who progress with or fail immunotherapy will need subsequent therapy, and there is limited data to guide treatment selection. New data from late-stage clinical trials introduce emerging targeted agents with great promise in improving outcomes for these patients. As these options have recently become available and shown the ability to improve outcomes in patients with this difficult to treat disease, it is imperative that physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date regarding these novel treatments, so that they can properly approve and select therapy based on individual patient characteristics for improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Strategies for Managing Immune-Related Adverse Events Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

Bladder cancer, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, there will be 80,470 new cases of bladder cancer and 17,670 deaths in the United States in 2020. Before the advent of new treatments in recent years, the basic management of this illness has remained unchanged for decades. Long-term survival for people diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer is poor, with approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bladder cancer surviving for 5 years or more. As the role of the immune system in oncogenesis and therapy has become clearer across cancer types, new approaches emerged with important benefits in metastatic bladder cancer, which led to the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, when those options fail, options are sparse to manage this difficult disease. Fortunately for patients with metastatic bladder cancer, new agents, including antibody-drug conjugates, have recently emerged for patients who have failed on immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be educated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the metastatic bladder cancer patient population.

While immunotherapy has revolutionized care for metastatic bladder cancer, it doesn’t work for everyone. Patients who progress with or fail immunotherapy will need subsequent therapy, and there is limited data to guide treatment selection. New data from late-stage clinical trials introduce emerging targeted agents with great promise in improving outcomes for these patients. As these options have recently become available and shown the ability to improve outcomes in patients with this difficult to treat disease, it is imperative that physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date regarding these novel treatments, so that they can properly approve and select therapy based on individual patient characteristics for improved clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Best Practices in the Treatment and Management of Metastatic Melanoma: Expert Perspectives in Immunotherapy

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It will be found in approximately 73,870 people in the US in 2020 according to the National Cancer Institute. While it is the least common amongst skin cancers, it is by far the most deadly, with 9,940 people expected to die in 2020. Both of those numbers have been rising in recent years. Fortunately for patients with metastatic melanoma, significant progress has been made in the treatment of this deadly disease over the past few years, especially in the area of immunotherapies. This webinar on recent advances in the treatment and management of metastatic melanoma will provide attendees with updated treatment strategies, guidelines, and successful evidence-based treatment approaches from recent clinical data.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Patient-Focused Treatment Decisions in Pancreatic Cancer: An In-Depth Look at the Role of PARP Inhibitors

Pancreatic cancer arises when cells in the pancreas, a glandular organ behind the stomach, grow and divide out of control and form a tumor. In 2020, it is estimated that pancreatic cancer will be responsible for 45,750 deaths and 56,770 new cases. Pancreatic cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancers in the US and about 7% of all cancer deaths. Despite treatment advances, pancreatic cancer is associated with a relatively poor outcome for most patients. Pancreatic cancer remains among the most challenging malignancies to treat, but ongoing clinical research is continually emerging with the potential to improve outcomes and patient care. Fortunately for patients with pancreatic cancer, several new treatment options, including PARP inhibitors, have become available in recent years or have recently undergone successful late stage clinical trials. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in patients with a BRCA mutation. With these recent advances in the management of pancreatic cancer, it is critical to provide medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and others on the interprofessional management team with updated clinical trial data and strategies on the changing treatment paradigm, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, clinicians are being challenged to quickly diagnose pancreatic cancer and its corresponding stage, and provide the best evidenced-based treatment that is available for patients. Clinicians are increasingly able to select more potent – and soon, more targeted – options for disease management. In the wake of these advances, other innovative therapies are being rapidly developed, from stroma- and BRCA-targeting agents, to immunotherapy and tumor treating fields. New classes of targeted agents are in development for pancreatic cancer for the first time, including PARP inhibitors. Recent studies have shown that PARP inhibitors have significantly delayed the progression of metastatic pancreatic cancer in patients with BRCA gene mutations. The complexities of today’s more personalized care pose multiple challenges to effective clinical and economic management of pancreatic cancer. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are provided with a detailed overview of current and emerging strategies for pancreatic cancer, with a focus on patient-centric therapy. A review of the most recent clinical trial data for molecularly targeted therapies will be provided, as will a discussion of new and emerging drug classes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Recent Advances in the Management of Insomnia: New Considerations in Treatment Strategies

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. Lack of sleep can sap your energy level, affects your mood, and causes stress with your health, work performance and quality of life. If not treated properly, insomnia can lead to other adverse effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration and memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. Many adults experience acute insomnia, which last for days or weeks and is usually the result of stress or a traumatic event in one’s life. Some experience chronic insomnia which can last for a month or more. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease and about 25% of them experience acute insomnia each year, with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.

There are several different approaches to the diagnosis of insomnia although there is no definitive test for it. Tools used for diagnosing the disease include a sleep log, which tracks the details of a person’s sleep, sleep inventory of sleeping patterns, blood tests and undergoing a sleep study. These tests help determine the level of insomnia and what treatment plan should be utilized. Insomnia continues to be underdiagnosed and undertreated. Identifying sleep hygiene issues can raise awareness of sleep patterns that need to be changed. Cognitive behavioral therapy has proven efficacy as first-line treatment for insomnia. This can include stimulus control therapy, relaxation techniques, and sleep restriction. However, there are some patients that do not respond to nonpharmacologic treatments and they need to supplement a patient’s nonpharmacologic treatment with a pharmacologic agent. There are currently new treatments that are in clinical trials, including a dual orexin receptor antagonist, which will help regulate sleep by dampening wakefulness without stopping the ability to awaken the external stimuli.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Navigating Recent Advances in the Treatment of Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC): Expert Perspectives on Immunotherapy in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of tumors that originate in the lip/oral cavity, hypopharynx, oropharynx, nasopharynx, and larynx. An estimated 48,330 new cases are diagnosed annually in the US, and 9,570 people die of the disease. HNSCC historically has been associated with tobacco and alcohol use; however, during the past decade, infection with HPV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a growing subset of HNSCCs. Despite advances and innovations in past years, the prognosis for metastatic disease remains poor. Fortunately for patients with metastatic HNSCC, new immunotherapeutic options, which have shown improved efficacy and safety, have recently become available to give clinicians and managed care professionals more options when managing a population of metastatic HNSCC patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Expert Perspectives in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer are to be diagnosed in women in the United States during 2020. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 40,290 women are expected to die from breast cancer this year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, in the later stages of disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Fortunately for patients with advanced breast cancer, several new agents, including PARP inhibitors, have recently become available. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in the area of HER2- metastatic breast cancer.

With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, clinicians are being challenged to quickly diagnose breast cancer and its corresponding stage, and provide the best evidenced-based treatment that is available for patients. Nearly 80% of patients with advanced breast cancer have the HER2-negative subtype and therefore are not candidates for HER2-targeting therapies. Therapy for advanced breast cancer is increasingly personalized, thanks to an array of molecularly targeted/endocrine therapies indicated for recurrent/advanced disease. New classes of targeted agents have been recently introduced or are in development for advanced breast cancer, including PARP inhibitors. The complexities of today’s more personalized care pose multiple challenges to effective clinical and economic management of advanced breast cancer. It is for this reason that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are provided with a detailed overview of current and emerging strategies for breast cancer, with a focus on individualized therapy. A review of the most recent clinical data for endocrine and molecularly targeted therapies will be provided, as will a discussion of new and emerging drug classes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Best Practices in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Expert Perspectives on Novel Therapies

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a kidney cancer that originates in the lining of the proximal convoluted tubule, a part of the very small tubes in the kidney that transport waste molecules from the blood to the urine. RCC is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, responsible for approximately 90–95% of cases. In 2020, it is estimated that there will be approximately 73,750 new cases of kidney cancer, and about 14,830 people will die from the disease. Approximately 16% of patients with RCC will have metastases at diagnosis, and as many as 40% will demonstrate metastasis after primary surgical treatment for localized RCC. With a 5-year survival rate ranging from 5% to 12%, the prognosis for these patients is poor. Fortunately for patients with advanced RCC, several new treatments, including targeted therapies and immunotherapies, have recently become available giving clinicians new options to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Additionally, new combination regimens comprised of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and anti-PD-1 immunotherapies have shown improved efficacy and safety in clinical trials. With so many new options becoming available for the healthcare community, clinicians are struggling to stay abreast of all the changes in advanced RCC treatment. It is critical that medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes.

The prognosis for any treated renal cell cancer patient with progressing, recurring, or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage. Almost all patients with advanced renal cell cancer are incurable. The question and selection of further treatment depends on many factors, including previous treatment and site of recurrence, as well as individual patient considerations. Fortunately, clinicians have recently been equipped with more options to integrate into the advanced RCC treatment paradigm, including targeted therapies and immunotherapies, which individualize therapy for patients with advanced RCC who have progressed on prior therapies, ultimately improving patient outcomes and quality of life. Additionally, multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and anti-PD-1 immunotherapies have been combined in clinical trials with impressive results. These new options have shown improved efficacy and safety in advanced RCC, and medical directors, oncologists, nurses and other healthcare professionals must be educated on these options and the potential risks that come along with any new treatment option.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in Management of HIV

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Integrating the Latest Data and Guidelines in the Management of HIV: Strategies for Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in HIV: A Closer Look at the Role of Novel Long-Acting Injectable and Implantable ART Formulations

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in HIV: What Does Managed Care Need to Know About New and Emerging Therapies?

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

New Horizons in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD): Leveraging Treatment Breakthroughs to Make Informed Decisions in Managed Care

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic, life-long, debilitating disease with many forms that can range in clinical severity from asymptomatic to life-threatening. In the US, SCD affects an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 Americans. This disease can lead to the obstruction of blood vessels, reduced blood flow to vital organs, and a weakened immune system. Fortunately for patients, novel therapies have been approved that have shown tremendous benefit in SCD.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

What Managed Care Needs to Know about New and Emerging Therapies in Management of
Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic, life-long, debilitating disease with many forms that can range in clinical severity from asymptomatic to life-threatening. In the US, SCD affects an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 Americans. This disease can lead to the obstruction of blood vessels, reduced blood flow to vital organs, and a weakened immune system. Fortunately for patients, novel therapies have been approved that have shown tremendous benefit in SCD.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

A Deeper Look into New Therapies in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease: How the Latest Advances May Impact Decision-Making

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic, life-long, debilitating disease with many forms that can range in clinical severity from asymptomatic to life-threatening. In the US, SCD affects an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 Americans. This disease can lead to the obstruction of blood vessels, reduced blood flow to vital organs, and a weakened immune system. Fortunately for patients, novel therapies have been approved that have shown tremendous benefit in SCD.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Sickle Cell Disease: Strategies for Managing Adverse Events Associated with New and Emerging Therapies

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic, life-long, debilitating disease with many forms that can range in clinical severity from asymptomatic to life-threatening. In the US, SCD affects an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 Americans. This disease can lead to the obstruction of blood vessels, reduced blood flow to vital organs, and a weakened immune system. Fortunately for patients, novel therapies have been approved that have shown tremendous benefit in SCD.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Evolving Treatment Strategies in the Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): Individualized Therapy for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for roughly 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages. The American Cancer Society estimates that there were approximately 21,380 new cases of AML and 10,590 deaths from AML in the United States in 2019. The five-year survival rate has not improved in older patients despite of 40 years of research. Fortunately for patients with AML, many new treatments are are now here or are on the horizon. New options, which have the ability to target certain types of mutations, have been approved in AML for the first time since 1990. With so many new options becoming available in the next few years, the treatment paradigm in AML, especially in relapsed or refractory disease, is set to drastically change. With that change comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and nurses. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the AML patient population.

AML has several subtypes and treatment and prognosis vary among subtypes. After AML has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out the subtype. This is especially important, as several new treatments focus on AML disease with certain mutations, including FLT3. Following older treatment paradigms, AML has been cured in 35-40% of people under 60 years old, but only in 5-15% of people over 60 years old. Fortunately for patients with AML, that treatment paradigm has begun to dramatically change, as novel targeted agents have shown improved efficacy and safety outcomes in recent clinical data. It is imperative that physician medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date regarding this new data in these novel treatments, as one has already become available and more options are set to follow.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL): Expert Perspectives on BTK Inhibitors and MRD

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that affects older adults. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults and affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, including BTK inhibitors, giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies.

After chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out how far the cancer has spread in the blood and bone marrow. While generally considered incurable, CLL progresses slowly in most cases. CLL treatment focuses on controlling the disease and its symptoms. Initial CLL treatments vary depending on the exact diagnosis and the progression of the disease. Fortunately, clinicians have recently been equipped with more options, including BTK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety in CLL, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these options and the potential benefits and risks that come along with any treatment option.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Patient-Focused Treatment Decisions in HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: A Closer Look at the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer found in women, regardless of race or ethnicity. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer are to be diagnosed in women in the United States during 2020. The incidence in women in the United States is 1 in 8 (about 12 percent). About 40,290 women are expected to die from breast cancer this year, though death rates have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. HER2-positive breast cancer is a breast cancer that tests positive for a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). This protein promotes the growth of cancer cells. In about 1 of every 5 breast cancers, the cancer cells have extra copies of the gene that makes the HER2 protein. HER2-positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer. Additionally, in the later stages of HER2+ disease, when distant metastases are present, cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the HER2+ metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. Treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life.

Fortunately for patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer, several new agents have been recently approved. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes in the approximately 40% of patients living with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. With these options entering the treatment paradigm, it is critical to provide medical directors, oncologists, practicing physicians and others on the interprofessional management team with updated clinical data and strategies on these new therapies the changing treatment paradigm, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): Expert Perspectives on the Evolving Role of Immunotherapy

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer and the prevalence and mortality rate of liver cancer has been rising steadily over the past decade. Liver cancer is still on the rise and death rates are increasing faster than any other type of cancer. Fortunately for patients with HCC, new agents have become available in the past few years, including novel immunotherapies. They have shown the ability to improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially with dual immune checkpoint blockade in the 1st-line advanced HCC setting. Several immunotherapies are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review as well in advanced HCC. For the treatment of HCC, transplantation is an option for patients. Unfortunately, there is a limited supply of good-quality deceased donor organs. Thus, other treatments, including systemic therapy, should be used to bridge patients to transplant or to delay recurrence if possible, in HCC. Fortunately, clinicians have been equipped with new individualized options in the past few years, including immunotherapies, which provide options for the unmet need of treatment in HCC, especially in dual immune checkpoint blockade in the 1st-line advanced HCC setting. Several PD-L1 immunotherapy options are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review that have shown the ability to continue to close gaps in treatment for patients with advanced HCC. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown improved efficacy and safety in HCC, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these options, how they should be integrated into the treatment paradigm, and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: A Closer Look at the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 10% of hematologic malignancies. In 2020, it is estimated that MM will be responsible for 12,960 new deaths and 32,110 new cases. Multiple myeloma is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable. It is potentially curable when it presents as a solitary plasmacytoma of bone or as an extramedullary plasmacytoma. The median survival in the prechemotherapy era was about 7 months. After the introduction of chemotherapy, prognosis improved significantly with a median survival of 24 months to 30 months and a 10-year survival of 3%. There are several novel options currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes. It is important that medical directors, oncologists, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date on these emerging therapies and how these options might be integrated into evolving treatment paradigms in the management of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma treatment.

Multiple Myeloma is staged by estimating the myeloma tumor cell mass on the basis of the amount of monoclonal (or myeloma) protein (M protein) in the serum and/or urine, along with various clinical parameters, such as the hemoglobin and serum calcium concentrations, the number of lytic bone lesions, and the presence or absence of renal failure. The stage of the disease at presentation is a strong determinant of survival. Treatment selection is influenced by the age and general health of the patient, prior therapy, and the presence of complications of the disease. Despite treatment advances in the last several years, multiple myeloma remains a disease with poor long-term survival as it is currently incurable and all patients will eventually relapse, underlining the need for new therapies. Fortunately for patients with MM, new options are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review, including novel peptide-drug conjugates that rapidly deliver a cytotoxic payload into myeloma cells, which appear to improve patient outcomes at a significant rate. It is critical that medical directors, oncologists, pharmacy directors and nurses are updated about these novel therapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Personalized Treatment Strategies in the Management of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 174,000 new cases diagnosed in 2019. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. Patients with all stages of prostate cancer have many treatment options available to them, from front-line therapy to second-line therapy and beyond with both immunotherapy and chemotherapy as current options. Recently updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, biomarkers and appropriate patient selection criteria in patients with prostate cancer have been produced and are being used to better treat the disease. The measurement of PSA level has also recently improved the diagnosis of prostate cancer, which is important because it helps identify patients who have prostate cancer and are undertreated. This marker is used for early diagnosis and monitoring for disease recurrence. PSA is the most common biochemical marker for prostate cancer and is used as a screening tool, although it remains prostate specific and not necessarily prostate cancer specific.

The advances in the past few years have resulted in the investigations of several novel targeted therapies, including androgen receptor inhibitor (ARI) targeting agents, antineoplastic agent and gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), antiangiogenic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, anti-apoptotic protein inhibitors and proteasome inhibitors. There are also updated options for treatments being used to improve outcomes for hormone sensitive prostate cancer. Several of these options have either received approval from the FDA or are in late clinical trials based on improvement of intermediate surrogate endpoints such as PSA levels or circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts in recent clinical trials.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of all lung cancer cases. Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. More people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. As more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets, especially around EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer.

NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, and despite progress in early detection and treatment, prognosis is poor. Historically, treatment has included a variety of modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. More recently, therapeutic options for NSCLC have evolved to include targeted agents that have the ability to individualize treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC. The expanding role of these therapies and the concept of tailoring therapies based on clinical and molecular markers are transforming the treatment of NSCLC. Molecular testing has now become a critical part of selecting treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC. The first-line management of EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC has begun to change with new indications bringing more options to the table. With this in mind, it is imperative that oncologists, medical directors and nurses are informed about these new treatments options, as well as the importance of molecular testing when selecting a treatment regimen.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC): A Closer Look at the Role of New and Emerging Immunotherapy

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive form of the disease that comprises 15% of all new lung cancer cases diagnosed each year and this type of lung cancer tends to grow and spread faster than non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). About 70% of people with SCLC will have cancer that has already spread at the time they are diagnosed. Outcomes for patients with SCLC are poor with a median survival of less than 1 year. SCLC is a disease with limited treatment options, presenting a strong unmet need, especially for patients with metastatic disease that has progressed on or after platinum-based therapy. Fortunately for patients with metastatic SCLC, there are several therapy options, including immunotherapies, that have been approved recently that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes.

The treatment options for SCLC are based mainly on the stage of the cancer, but other factors, such as a person’s overall health and lung function are also important. Sometimes, combination options or multiple therapies are used. More recently immunotherapies have become available that give clinicians a new option with improved safety and efficacy profiles in the fight against SCLC. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have recently become available for patients with extensive stage SCLC in many different treatment lines. Additionally, new clinical trial data and novel options have become available that shows the promise of immunotherapy in the first line setting of extensive stage SCLC. The concept of tailoring therapies based on clinical and molecular markers has transformed the management of SCLC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Melanoma: A Closer Look at Recent Advances in Immunotherapy

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It will be found in approximately 73,870 people in the US in 2020 according to the National Cancer Institute. While it is the least common amongst skin cancers, it is by far the most deadly, with 9,940 people expected to die in 2020. Both of those numbers have been rising in recent years. Fortunately for patients with metastatic melanoma, significant progress has been made in the treatment of this deadly disease over the past few years, especially in the area of immunotherapies. This webinar on recent advances in the treatment and management of metastatic melanoma will provide attendees with updated treatment strategies, guidelines, and successful evidence-based treatment approaches from recent clinical data.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Ovarian Cancer: What Does Managed Care Need to Know About PARP Inhibitors?

There will be an estimated 22,440 new cases of ovarian cancer this year in the United States, and an estimated 14,080 deaths. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving HCPs more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are PARP inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2022

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Ovarian Cancer: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Recent Advances in PARP Inhibitors

There will be an estimated 22,440 new cases of ovarian cancer this year in the United States, and an estimated 14,080 deaths. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving HCPs more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are PARP inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into PARP Inhibitors in the Management of Ovarian Cancer: Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

There will be an estimated 22,440 new cases of ovarian cancer this year in the United States, and an estimated 14,080 deaths. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving HCPs more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are PARP inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Ovarian Cancer: Strategies for Anticipating, Recognizing, and Managing Adverse Events Associated with PARP Inhibitors

There will be an estimated 22,440 new cases of ovarian cancer this year in the United States, and an estimated 14,080 deaths. Ovarian cancer is usually found late, stage 3 or higher, where it has already spread or metastasized to other parts of the abdomen, or worse. The five year survival rate is only 45%. Fortunately for patients with ovarian cancer, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past three years, giving HCPs more options in managing patients with ovarian cancer. Leading the way in new options for ovarian cancer are PARP inhibitors, which have shown improved efficacy for patients with ovarian cancer.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2022

New Horizons in the treatment and Management of Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Emerging Therapies

Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 10% of hematologic malignancies. In 2020, it is estimated that MM will be responsible for 12,960 new deaths and 32,110 new cases. In recent years, more treatments have become available that have increased survival numbers significantly, though prognosis still remains rather poor, especially in relapsed/refractory (R/R) disease. Fortunately for patients with R/R MM, there are several novel options that have been recently approved or are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Emerging Therapies in the Management of Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: What Does Recent Clinical Trial Data Have to Say?

Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 10% of hematologic malignancies. In 2020, it is estimated that MM will be responsible for 12,960 new deaths and 32,110 new cases. In recent years, more treatments have become available that have increased survival numbers significantly, though prognosis still remains rather poor, especially in relapsed/refractory (R/R) disease. Fortunately for patients with R/R MM, there are several novel options that have been recently approved or are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: Anticipating and Managing Adverse Events Associated with Emerging Therapies

Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 10% of hematologic malignancies. In 2020, it is estimated that MM will be responsible for 12,960 new deaths and 32,110 new cases. In recent years, more treatments have become available that have increased survival numbers significantly, though prognosis still remains rather poor, especially in relapsed/refractory (R/R) disease. Fortunately for patients with R/R MM, there are several novel options that have been recently approved or are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

What Managed Care Needs to Know about Emerging Therapies in the Management of Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 10% of hematologic malignancies. In 2020, it is estimated that MM will be responsible for 12,960 new deaths and 32,110 new cases. In recent years, more treatments have become available that have increased survival numbers significantly, though prognosis still remains rather poor, especially in relapsed/refractory (R/R) disease. Fortunately for patients with R/R MM, there are several novel options that have been recently approved or are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials that have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

Expert Perspectives on the Role of BTK Inhibitors in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL): What Managed Care Needs to Know for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the BTK gene. BTK is abundantly expressed and constitutively active in the pathogenesis of B cell hematological malignancies. Therefore, BTK is considered as an attractive target for treatment of B-cell malignancies. These options, known as BTK inhibitors, have changed the treatment paradigm in several different B-cell malignancies in recent years. These agents differ in dosing, efficacy, and toxicities, and as these options for B-cell malignancies grow, it is essential to understand their clinical and economic role in the treatment paradigm to offer patients the safest and most efficacious treatment, while also controlling costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into BTK Inhibitors in the Management of B-Cell Malignancies: Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the BTK gene. BTK is abundantly expressed and constitutively active in the pathogenesis of B cell hematological malignancies. Therefore, BTK is considered as an attractive target for treatment of B-cell malignancies. These options, known as BTK inhibitors, have changed the treatment paradigm in several different B-cell malignancies in recent years. These agents differ in dosing, efficacy, and toxicities, and as these options for B-cell malignancies grow, it is essential to understand their clinical and economic role in the treatment paradigm to offer patients the safest and most efficacious treatment, while also controlling costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Managing B-Cell Malignancies with BTK Inhibitors: Strategies for Anticipating, Recognizing, and Managing Adverse Events

Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the BTK gene. BTK is abundantly expressed and constitutively active in the pathogenesis of B cell hematological malignancies. Therefore, BTK is considered as an attractive target for treatment of B-cell malignancies. These options, known as BTK inhibitors, have changed the treatment paradigm in several different B-cell malignancies in recent years. These agents differ in dosing, efficacy, and toxicities, and as these options for B-cell malignancies grow, it is essential to understand their clinical and economic role in the treatment paradigm to offer patients the safest and most efficacious treatment, while also controlling costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care of BTK Inhibitors: What Does Managed Care Need to Know

Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the BTK gene. BTK is abundantly expressed and constitutively active in the pathogenesis of B cell hematological malignancies. Therefore, BTK is considered as an attractive target for treatment of B-cell malignancies. These options, known as BTK inhibitors, have changed the treatment paradigm in several different B-cell malignancies in recent years. These agents differ in dosing, efficacy, and toxicities, and as these options for B-cell malignancies grow, it is essential to understand their clinical and economic role in the treatment paradigm to offer patients the safest and most efficacious treatment, while also controlling costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Approaches in the Management of Hepatocellular
Carcinoma(HCC): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Emerging Combination Regimens

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the US. In 2019, it was expected that liver cancer accounted for approximately 788,000 deaths globally, making it the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately, new agents have recently been approved that provide new options for clinicians in the first-line setting. Additionally, targeted therapy and immunotherapy combinations have shown improved efficacy and safety in recent clinical trials. In this webinar series, attendees will learn about the latest data necessary to make appropriate formulary decisions and care for patients with HCC around these targeted and immunotherapy combination options, especially as more are approved and become available.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Targeted and Immunotherapeutic Combination Therapies in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the US. In 2019, it was expected that liver cancer accounted for approximately 788,000 deaths globally, making it the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately, new agents have recently been approved that provide new options for clinicians in the first-line setting. Additionally, targeted therapy and immunotherapy combinations have shown improved efficacy and safety in recent clinical trials. In this webinar series, attendees will learn about the latest data necessary to make appropriate formulary decisions and care for patients with HCC around these targeted and immunotherapy combination options, especially as more are approved and become available.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): Anticipating and Managing Treatment Related Adverse Events Associated with Emerging Combination Regimens

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the US. In 2019, it was expected that liver cancer accounted for approximately 788,000 deaths globally, making it the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately, new agents have recently been approved that provide new options for clinicians in the first-line setting. Additionally, targeted therapy and immunotherapy combinations have shown improved efficacy and safety in recent clinical trials. In this webinar series, attendees will learn about the latest data necessary to make appropriate formulary decisions and care for patients with HCC around these targeted and immunotherapy combination options, especially as more are approved and become available.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Targeted and Immunotherapy Combinations?

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, accounting for about 90% of cases of primary liver cancer in the US. In 2019, it was expected that liver cancer accounted for approximately 788,000 deaths globally, making it the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Prognosis is especially poor for those with unresectable HCC. Fortunately, new agents have recently been approved that provide new options for clinicians in the first-line setting. Additionally, targeted therapy and immunotherapy combinations have shown improved efficacy and safety in recent clinical trials. In this webinar series, attendees will learn about the latest data necessary to make appropriate formulary decisions and care for patients with HCC around these targeted and immunotherapy combination options, especially as more are approved and become available.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

The Era of Immunotherapy in Earlier Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
(NSCLC): What Managed Care Needs to Know for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.

This live webinar series on stage three and earlier NSCLC will provide attendees with critical updates on the advances in ICIs, including how to translate the most recent data into clinical and administrative practice.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Immunotherapies in Stage III and Earlier Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Stage III and Earlier Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunotherapies?

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Stage III and Earlier Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Anticipating and Managing Immune-Related Adverse Events

Lung cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The vast majority of these cases (about 85%) are characterized as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In recent years, NSCLC has been found to have a multidimensional typology and etiology driven by molecular changes in lung tissue. The knowledge that the molecular structure of tumor cells has been altered has led to the development of novel checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). It was only recently that ICIs have approved for treating patients with stage III disease following concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the aim of which is to prevent disease progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Approaches in the Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): A Closer Look at Advances in Immunotherapy in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Anticipating and Managing Immune-Related Adverse Events

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

A Deeper Look into Immunotherapies in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Emerging Combination Options in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunotherapies in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)?

Managed Care and clinical decision-making in the setting of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been undergoing dramatic change in the past few years. The approval of new immunotherapeutic agents has expanded the lines of therapy available to patients, especially around combination options, and raised questions about how rational treatment planning and effective sequencing of new and older standards of care can optimize patient outcomes. Additionally, the benefit of real-world experience and data from subgroup analyses and long-term follow-up of landmark clinical trials continue to refine treatment strategies in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

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