Health Management

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology, Additional Topics

Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine

Best Practices in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Managed Care Strategies for Immunizing in a COVID-19 Environment is a two-part webinar series

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. And now that is even more true with the COVID-19 pandemic of the last year. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults, and the affect that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on these immunizations. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2023

Best Practices in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Managed Care Strategies for Immunizing in a COVID-19 Environment

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. And now that is even more true with the COVID-19 pandemic of the last year. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults, and the affect that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on these immunizations. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2023

Recent Updates in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Strategies for Immunizing in a COVID-19 Environment

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. And now that is even more true with the COVID-19 pandemic of the last year. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults, and the affect that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on these immunizations. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2023

Closing Gaps and Overcoming Barriers in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Expert Perspectives for Improved Patient Outcomes

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Addressing the Challenges of HPV Vaccination and Prevention of HPV-related Cancers in Young and Older Adults

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various types of cancer. An estimated 79 million people in the United States are infected with some type of HPV, and approximately 50% of new infections occur in individuals before the age of 24. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, HPV vaccination coverage remains low. There are various reasons why the vaccination rates are low, including patients’ and/or parents’ lack of knowledge about HPV and their discomfort with talking to health care providers about sexual activity, affordability, among other reasons.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2022

Addressing the Challenges of HPV Vaccination and Prevention of HPV-related Cancers in Young and Older Adults

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various types of cancer. An estimated 79 million people in the United States are infected with some type of HPV, and approximately 50% of new infections occur in individuals before the age of 24. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, HPV vaccination coverage remains low. There are various reasons why the vaccination rates are low, including patients’ and/or parents’ lack of knowledge about HPV and their discomfort with talking to health care providers about sexual activity, affordability, among other reasons.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2022

Addressing the Challenges of HPV Vaccination and Prevention of HPV-related Cancers: Managed Care Considerations and Updates

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various types of cancer. An estimated 79 million people in the United States are infected with some type of HPV, and approximately 50% of new infections occur in individuals before the age of 24. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, HPV vaccination coverage remains low. There are various reasons why the vaccination rates are low, including patients’ and/or parents’ lack of knowledge about HPV and their discomfort with talking to health care providers about sexual activity, affordability, among other reasons.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2022

Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations is a two-part live webinar series that will provide attendees with the latest information on immunizations, costs, burdens and strategies to increase the success of immunizations, and more importantly, patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Closing Gaps in Adolescent Immunizations: Expert Perspectives for Improved Patient Outcomes

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes. Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations is a two-part live webinar series that will provide attendees with the latest information on immunizations, costs, burdens and strategies to increase the success of immunizations, and more importantly, patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Closing Gaps in Adult Immunizations: Overcoming Barriers to Effective Practices

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes. Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations is a two-part live webinar series that will provide attendees with the latest information on immunizations, costs, burdens and strategies to increase the success of immunizations, and more importantly, patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Behavioral Health

 

Chronic Illnesses

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology, Additional Topics

AutoImmune

New Horizons in the Treatment of Psoriasis: Key Strategies to Target Optimal Patient Outcomes

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million of the population in the United States. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. The disease most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumbosacral areas of the body. Psoriasis is a complex disease to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves on quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. The under diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis continues to be a serious concern Once psoriasis is diagnosed through a physical examination and a skin biopsy, treatment of the disease will depend on which type of psoriasis, where it is, and the severity of it. Novel treatments, such as biologics, work by inhibiting different types of cytokines. The early biologics work by inhibiting tumor necrosis (TNF)-alpha, a protein broadly involved in inflammation. Newer biologics are more targeted to the inflammatory pathways involved in psoriasis, which works by blocking two proteins — interleukin-17 and -23. These newer agents have been shown to be effective in treating psoriasis and could also be safer given their more specific action on the immune system. Recent research indicates that both IL-23 and IL-17 play important roles in the development of psoriatic plaques. Treatments that inhibit IL-23 and IL-17 have shown promising data in safety and efficacy in clinical trials of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Recent breakthroughs, and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis, have been translated into targeted and highly effective therapies providing fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases with a dominant IL-23/Th17 axis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

A Closer Look at the Latest Advances in the Treatment and Management of Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. AS is a form of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), in which SI structural damage is visible on X-rays; the other form is non-radiographic axSpA, in which structural damage has not occurred. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways. These new options have dramatically changed the treatment paradigm.

The goals of treatment are to minimize symptoms, maintain spinal flexibility and normal posture, reduce functional limitations, maintain work ability, and prevent the development of disease complications. While tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFi) changed the clinical trajectory of this disease, the benefits are only demonstrated in patients who respond to TNFis. Between 40% and 50% of patients with AS do not respond to TNFis, and in patients who do, long-term efficacy with disease remission is rarely achieved, which brought about a need for newer options showing improved efficacy and safety. These novel options have produced great benefit for patients who do not respond to a TNFi or who have progressed on that therapy. Additionally, clinicians have recently been finding that novel treatment options, including janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, are promising. These new options have shown improved efficacy and safety in AS, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these agents and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option. However, both practicing physicians and managed care physicians are likely less familiar with these newer therapies in AS and may have safety concerns and cost concerns.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Recent Therapeutic Strategies for Psoriatic Arthritis: Optimal Management for Personalized Patient Care

Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating disease that may affect up to 1 million adults in the United States, affecting men and women equally. Psoriatic arthritis is a progressive, inflammatory disease that is associated with a number of dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations. Patients can experience extreme pain and joint damage that may affect their quality of life, physical function, and ability to work. Symptoms include fatigue, joint inflammation, and potentially progressive joint damage.Diagnosing psoriatic arthritis can be very complex and the standard diagnostic measures are based on history, a physical exam and x-ray features, so establishing the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms associated in both the skin and joints, and by ruling out more common inflammatory arthritis, can be very helpful. The most commonly accepted diagnostic criterion is the CAPSER classification. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis can sometimes be delayed or missed by primary care providers and other healthcare professionals. With recent updates to the guidelines, there have been updates and advances in digital imaging tools and screening options that have improved the chances of catching psoriatic arthritis early, which allows for better treatment goals to be achieved.

The past few years have seen a number of treatments introduced for psoriatic arthritis. Along with symptomatic treatments, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and local corticosteroid injections into joints, there are also the oral small molecules (OSMs) for treatment. The Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors have been available for nearly 20 years and continue to be a viable option for patients. More recently key cytokines in the psoriatic disease pathophysiology have been introduced and they include Janus kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STATs) as well as are the interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, IL-22 and IL-23 pathway inhibitors. These newer biologic treatments target some of these key cytokines to treat psoriatic disease. Clinicians need to be able to incorporate these new approaches into treatment paradigms, considering both safety and efficacy, by being educated with appropriate management strategies that will guide treatment decisions for patients with psoriatic arthritis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Exploring the Latest Guidelines and Evidence of IBD Management: An Update in Diagnosis and Treatment

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, frequently progressive condition that affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States. This lifelong, systemic autoimmune illness often strikes patients at a young age and must be managed across a lifetime. According to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, there are as many as 70,000 new cases diagnosed in a year. The diagnosis of IBD is most commonly based on imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization, which may also include a combination of endoscopy and histopathology. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of IBD patients. The treatment goal for IBD is to reduce the inflammation, in hopes of achieving reduced symptoms and possibly remission. Immediate goals are to control the symptoms, induction of remission, and to help improve a patient’s quality of life, while long-term goals include maintenance of a corticosteroid-free clinical remission, mucosal healing, endoscopic remission, prevention or cure of complications, restoration, and maintenance of proper nutrition.

The first step for IBD treatment is aminosalicylates, which are useful for treating flares of IBD and for maintaining remission. There is also the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections that may result from abscesses or fistulas and corticosteroids can be used, as they are rapid-acting anti-inflammatory agents which are indicated for acute flares. Immunomodulators have a slower onset of action and work to reduce patients’ overactive immune system but unlike corticosteroids, they can be used as a long-term treatment. And the fifth way to treat IBD is with biologics. Currently, there are several approved biologics and small molecules available through the FDA and other regulatory organizations around the world. One of these treatments is the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Another treatment pathway is blocking interleukin (IL)-12 and -23 through the use of ustekinumab. A completely different mechanism is blocking the adhesion molecules to the integrin inhibitors. Then, more recently there have been advances in the first oral agents which consist of the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Evolving Considerations in the Treatment and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE): Managed Care Strategies in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by recurrent attacks of edema at different locations of the body. This potentially life-threatening disease affects approximately 1 in 67,000 individuals, with no identified differences in sex or ethnicity. HAE is characterized by recurrent edema attacks and the cutaneous attacks can be disabling, with the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and upper airways are most commonly affected and with a persistent risk to the patient of acute events of laryngeal swelling that may prove fatal if not treated in a timely manner. Angioedema in general can be confused with cellulitis, Graves disease, blepharochalasis, eosinophilic fasciitis, or amyloidosis which can lead to delays in diagnosis, and inappropriate treatment poses the risk of adverse events, unnecessary surgical interventions, a higher burden of misery, and a potentially higher rate of morbidity and mortality. Fortunately for patients with HAE, novel therapies have recently become available in the past year and a half that have shown improved efficacy and safety with improved administration methods. With these new options comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, pharmacists, immunologists and nurse case managers as the treatment paradigm is growing. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, including throughout formulary and health plan discussions, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the HAE patient population.

Early diagnosis and treatment of HAE is extremely important for all patients affected by this disorder. An individualized treatment plan should be developed in close collaboration with their clinicians in order to improve the quality of life of patients with HAE. The burden of this disease is increased with delayed diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, and limited patient access. Delays in diagnosis remain, as healthcare professionals often fail to include HAE in the differential diagnosis when patients present with attacks. Patients are therefore often misdiagnosed for several years before a diagnosis of HAE is finally made. Early diagnosis of the disease can lead to the development of an individualized treatment plan that assists in the prevention and management of attacks. Managed care clinicians and providers must be educated surrounding recognition of HAE and early diagnosis, prompt intervention for both acute treatment needs and long-term prevention, and HAE best practices, including newer and emerging agents for treatment of the disease. With this education, they can reduce symptom severity and occurrence, and improve outcomes in patients with this rare but serious disorder.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Preparing for a New Era in Alopecia Areata Management: Managed Care Considerations on the Role of New and Emerging Therapies is a three part webinar series

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease, characterized by hair loss, often patchy, on the scalp, face, or body. People suffering from alopecia areata experience symptoms when immune cells attack healthy hair follicles, causing the hair to fall out, often starting with smooth, round patches. More than half of patients with alopecia areata experience poor health-related quality of life and, as a result, the condition may lead to serious psychological consequences, including high levels of depression and anxiety. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials, including JAK inhibitors and combinations, that have shown improved efficacy and safety.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

A Closer Look at Emerging Therapies in the Management of Alopecia Areata: Managed Care Considerations on JAK Inhibitors in an Evolving Treatment Landscape

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease, characterized by hair loss, often patchy, on the scalp, face, or body. People suffering from alopecia areata experience symptoms when immune cells attack healthy hair follicles, causing the hair to fall out, often starting with smooth, round patches. More than half of patients with alopecia areata experience poor health-related quality of life and, as a result, the condition may lead to serious psychological consequences, including high levels of depression and anxiety. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials, including JAK inhibitors and combinations, that have shown improved efficacy and safety.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

Reducing the Economic Burden of Alopecia Areata: What Managed Care Needs to Know to About the Health Economics of a Changing Management Paradigm

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease, characterized by hair loss, often patchy, on the scalp, face, or body. People suffering from alopecia areata experience symptoms when immune cells attack healthy hair follicles, causing the hair to fall out, often starting with smooth, round patches. More than half of patients with alopecia areata experience poor health-related quality of life and, as a result, the condition may lead to serious psychological consequences, including high levels of depression and anxiety. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials, including JAK inhibitors and combinations, that have shown improved efficacy and safety.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

A Closer Look at the Clinical, Economic and Developmental Impact of Alopecia Areata: Strategies to Improve Patient Adherence, Quality of Life, and Costs

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease, characterized by hair loss, often patchy, on the scalp, face, or body. People suffering from alopecia areata experience symptoms when immune cells attack healthy hair follicles, causing the hair to fall out, often starting with smooth, round patches. More than half of patients with alopecia areata experience poor health-related quality of life and, as a result, the condition may lead to serious psychological consequences, including high levels of depression and anxiety. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials, including JAK inhibitors and combinations, that have shown improved efficacy and safety.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2023

Implementing Expert Treatment Strategies in the Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, frequently progressive condition that affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States. This lifelong, systemic autoimmune illness often strikes patients at a young age and must be managed across a lifetime. The diagnosis of IBD is most commonly based on imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization, which may also include a combination of endoscopy and histopathology. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of IBD patients. The treatment goal for IBD is to reduce the inflammation, in hopes of achieving reduced symptoms and possibly remission. Immediate goals are to control the symptoms, induction of remission, and to help improve a patient’s quality of life, while long-term goals include maintenance of a corticosteroid-free clinical remission, mucosal healing, endoscopic remission, prevention or cure of complications, restoration, and maintenance of proper nutrition. The first step for IBD treatment is aminosalicylates, which are useful for treating flares of IBD and for maintaining remission. There is also the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections that may result from abscesses or fistulas. Corticosteroids can be used, as they are rapid-acting anti-inflammatory agents, are indicated for acute flares of disease only and have no role in the maintenance of remission. Immunomodulators have a slower onset of action and work to reduce patients’ overactive immune system but unlike corticosteroids, they can be used as a long-term treatment. And the fifth way to treat IBD is with biologics, which are proteins that stop certain molecules in the body from causing inflammation in the GI tract. These are usually prescribed to those living with moderate to severe cases of IBD who have not responded to other types of treatment.

Advances in IBD treatment have improved outcomes for many patients but personalizing therapy and predicting response to therapy continues to be a big challenge. This has led to underutilization of effective regimens, undertreatment, and suboptimal outcomes. Addressing new and emerging clinical decision support tools can help providers bridge this gap by predicting individualized disease complication risk and appropriate responses to therapy. Currently, there are several approved biologics and small molecules available through the FDA and other regulatory organizations around the world. One of these treatments is the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Another treatment pathway is blocking interleukin (IL)-12 and -23 through the use of ustekinumab. A completely different mechanism is blocking the adhesion molecules to the integrin inhibitors. Then, more recently there have been advances in the first oral agents which consist of the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. New updates in these treatments, as well as the presence of biologic therapies, has changed goals and expectations of inflammatory bowel disease management and gives patients a better chance of achieving remission.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Innovative Approaches for Advanced Treatment and Management of Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating disease that may affect up to 1 million adults in the United States, affecting men and women equally. Psoriatic arthritis is a progressive, inflammatory disease that is associated with a number of dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations. Patients can experience extreme pain and joint damage that may affect their quality of life, physical function, and ability to work. Symptoms include fatigue, joint inflammation, and potentially progressive joint damage. Diagnosing psoriatic arthritis can be very complex with the most critical factor being the absence of validated criteria for identifying and classifying cases that will help diagnose the disease. The standard diagnostic measures are based on history, a physical exam and x-ray features, so establishing the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms associated in both the skin and joints, and by ruling out more common inflammatory arthritis, can be very helpful.

The past few years have seen a number of treatments introduced for psoriatic arthritis. Along with symptomatic treatments, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and local corticosteroid injections into joints, there are also the oral small molecules (OSMs) for treatment. The Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors have been available for nearly 20 years and continue to be a viable option for patients. More recently key cytokines in the psoriatic disease pathophysiology have been introduced and they include Janus kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STATs) as well as are the interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, IL-22 and IL-23 pathway inhibitors. These newer biologic treatments target some of these key cytokines to treat psoriatic disease. Clinicians need to be able to incorporate these new approaches into treatment paradigms, considering both safety and efficacy, by being educated with appropriate management strategies that will guide treatment decisions for patients with psoriatic arthritis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Developments in the Treatment and Management of Psoriasis: Key Considerations for Improving Outcomes

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million of the population in the United States. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. The disease most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumboscaral areas of the body. Psoriasis is a complex disease to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves on quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. The under diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis continues to be a serious concern. Once psoriasis is diagnosed through a physical examination and a skin biopsy, treatment of the disease will depend on which type of psoriasis, where it is, and the severity of it. Newer treatments, such as biologics, work by inhibiting different types of cytokines while the early biologics work by inhibiting tumor necrosis (TNF)-alpha, a protein broadly involved in inflammation. Newer biologics are more targeted to the inflammatory pathways involved in psoriasis, which works by blocking two proteins — interleukin-17 and -23. These newer agents have been shown to be effective in treating psoriasis and could also be safer given their more specific action on the immune system. There are also newer non-biologic systemic treatments for psoriasis and they do not directly inhibit inflammatory cytokines and is thought to have no increased risk of infection; however, it is generally less effective in treating psoriasis. Recent research indicates that both IL-23 and IL-17 play important roles in the development of psoriatic plaques. Treatments that inhibit IL-23 and IL-17 have shown promising data in safety and efficacy in clinical trials of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Recent breakthroughs, and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis, have been translated into targeted and highly effective therapies providing fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases with a dominant IL-23/Th17 axis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Chronic Cough With Unexplained Cause: Emerging Therapies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Chronic Cough With Unexplained Causes

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2022

What Managed Care Needs to Know About Chronic Cough: Novel Therapies for Improved Outcomes

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2022

Confronting the Clinical and Economic Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

A Deep Dive into Emerging Therapies in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: Managed Care Considerations on Recent Clinical Data in an Evolving Treatment Landscape

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

Reducing the Economic Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: What Managed Care Needs to Know to About the Changing Paradigm

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

A Closer Look at the Clinical, Economic and Developmental Impact of Atopic Dermatitis: Strategies to Improve Patient Adherence, Quality of Life, Costs and Work Productivity

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

Improving the Clinical and Economic Burden of Ankylosing Spondylitis: Targeting IL17/IL-23 Pathways for Optimized Patient Outcomes

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.

This webinar series on integrating IL-17 and IL-23 therapies into the treatment paradigm will provide attendees with updated education on these novel treatment options, emerging value equations, the limitations of established treatment options, and recent clinical data on these new agents to optimize the management of patients with AS.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Managed Care Insights on IL-17/23 Inhibitors

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

A Closer Look at IL-17 and IL-23 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis: Individualizing Therapy for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Strategies for Managing Treatment Related Adverse Events Associated with IL-17 Inhibitors

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Immunoglobulin Replacement in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in PIDD: Strategies for Improving Administration and Managing Adverse Events

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in PIDD: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy?

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Immunoglobulin Replacement in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in PIDD: Strategies for Improving Administration and Managing Adverse Events

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in PIDD: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy?

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Cardiovascular

Navigating Advances in the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Understanding Multidisciplinary Approaches to Optimize Outcomes

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a progressive vascular disorder characterized by vascular remodeling of the pulmonary arteries which carry blood from the heart to the lungs. For those with PAH, the muscles within the arterial walls tighten, which can cause thickening and/or scar tissue to develop, increasingly narrowing their diameter. This leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance that leads to right ventricular failure and significant morbidity and mortality. Over time, the heart muscle can become so weakened that its ability to pump enough blood through the body is lost, leading to heart failure. The estimated prevalence is between 15 and 50 cases per million individuals and about half of people diagnosed with PAH will not live past five years, while those with untreated PAH have an average survival expectancy of approximately three years following diagnosis – and even with aggressive management, PAH has a 15% annual mortality rate.

There continue to be significant challenges in identifying and diagnosing PAH because it requires a combination of information based on symptoms, a physician examination, risk factors, and other findings based on previous tests. Evaluation to detect the presence of PAH requires a comprehensive set of tests, which typically include laboratory testing, echocardiography, pulmonary function testing, assessment of exercise capacity with six-minute walk distance or cardiopulmonary exercising testing, imaging, nocturnal oximetry and/or overnight polysomnography, and right heart catheterization. These extensive tests are crucial in determining the severity of PAH and the appropriate treatment strategies for patients on an individual basis, driven by a provider’s knowledge of each patient’s specific needs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Heart Failure: A Closer Look at the Role of Emerging Therapies is a two-part webinar series

Heart failure (HF) is a common condition that affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure has traditionally been poor. Projections show that by 2030, the prevalence of heart failure will increase 46 percent from recent estimates. HF is the reason for more than 1 million hospitalizations per year and an estimated $31 billion in costs in the U.S. each year. Fortunately for patients with HF, new and emerging therapeutic options have improved both clinical and economic outcomes for these patients and the system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2023

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Heart Failure: A Closer Look at the Role of New Therapies

Heart failure (HF) is a common condition that affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure has traditionally been poor. Projections show that by 2030, the prevalence of heart failure will increase 46 percent from recent estimates. HF is the reason for more than 1 million hospitalizations per year and an estimated $31 billion in costs in the U.S. each year. Fortunately for patients with HF, new and emerging therapeutic options have improved both clinical and economic outcomes for these patients and the system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2023

Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of Heart Failure: Managed Care Considerations on New and Emerging Therapies

Heart failure (HF) is a common condition that affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure has traditionally been poor. Projections show that by 2030, the prevalence of heart failure will increase 46 percent from recent estimates. HF is the reason for more than 1 million hospitalizations per year and an estimated $31 billion in costs in the U.S. each year. Fortunately for patients with HF, new and emerging therapeutic options have improved both clinical and economic outcomes for these patients and the system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2023

Multidisciplinary Approaches for Improving Patient Care in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Advances in Therapeutic Selection

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a progressive vascular disorder characterized by vascular remodeling of the pulmonary arteries which carry blood from the heart to the lungs. For those with PAH, the muscles within the arterial walls tighten, which often leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance that leads to right ventricular failure and significant morbidity and mortality. Over time, the heart muscle can become so weakened that its ability to pump enough blood through the body is lost, leading to heart failure. About half of people diagnosed with PAH will not live past five years, while those with untreated PAH have an average survival expectancy of approximately three years following diagnosis. There continue to be significant challenges in identifying and diagnosing PAH because it requires a combination of information based on symptoms, a physician examination, risk factors, and other findings based on previous tests. Evaluation typically include laboratory testing, echocardiography, pulmonary function testing, assessment of exercise capacity with six-minute walk distance or cardiopulmonary exercising testing, imaging, and a right heart catheterization among others.

The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) also published new treatment guidelines in 2019. There are a wide variety of treatment options to help manage PAH, including general measures, nonspecific pharmacologic intervention and targeted pharmacologic intervention. These include monotherapy and combination therapies that can include prostacyclin/prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Physicians must be able to make tailored treatment decisions for individual patients, based on their diagnosis and severity, for proper management. Optimal treatment, accurate classification, and risk stratification are keys to managing the patient’s health and costs, as incorrect classification can lead to inappropriate treatment decisions. The current guidance recommendations suggest that the optimal therapeutic approach for each patient must be personalized to take into account a patient’s severity, route of administration of therapy, adverse effect profiles, comorbidity, and achieving treatment goals. As such, patients require access to all indicated treatment options to optimize disease management.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2023

Therapeutic Advances in the Management of Hyperkalemia with End Stage Renal Disease: Improving Clinical and Cost Outcomes in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Novel Potassium Binders in the Management of Hyperkalemia with End Stage Renal Disease: Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Cost Outcomes

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Hyperkalemia with End Stage Renal Disease: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Newer Therapies?

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life Hyperkalemia with ESRD: Strategies for Detecting and Managing Adverse Events with Novel Therapies

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Diabetes

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: Optimizing Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes with SGLT2 Inhibitors

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the United States, or 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes, and that one in three Americans born in 2019 will develop diabetes sometime during their lifetime. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), uncontrolled type 2 DM doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with type 2 DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of type 2 DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in Type 2 Diabetes management have given healthcare professionals the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. The economic cost of diabetes is staggering. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse and ADA, the total estimated cost of diabetes is about $174 billion, including $116 billion in direct medical costs and $58 billion in reduced national productivity. Medical costs attributed to diabetes included $27 billion for care to directly treat diabetes, $58 billion to treat the portion of diabetes-related chronic complications that are attributed to diabetes, and $31 billion in excess general medical costs. Moreover, it has been estimated that people with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures that are approximately 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes. The price tag associated with treatment of type 2 DM increases with disease severity, as more and more dollars are spent managing the significant comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, associated with advanced type 2 DM.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Treatment Advances for Challenging Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Fixed-Ration Combinations of Basal Insulin and GLP-1

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Fixed-Ratio Combinations of Basal Insulin and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists: What Does the Data Have to Say?

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

What Managed Care Needs to Know about Reducing Healthcare Costs with Fixed-Ratio Combinations of Basal Insulin and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Challenging Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Anticipating and Managing Adverse Events Associated with Basal Insulin and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Infectious Disease

A New Era in the Prevention and Management of CMV Infection

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a frequent complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation (SOT) recipients. In addition to causing a variety of end-organ diseases, CMV infection is also associated with rejection after SOT and with graft versus host disease (GVHD) after HSCT. Antiviral prophylaxis is effective against direct and indirect effects of CMV infection. Preemptive therapy, more commonly used after HSCT, is based on surveillance, and targets therapy to patients at highest risk. Novel antiviral therapies with different mechanisms of action have recently become available giving healthcare professionals new options in the management of this infection. This program will take a look at those advances and provide up to date strategies for the management of CMV infection.

This webinar series on the evolving role of novel therapies in CMV infection management will take a close look at recent guideline updates, clinical data, and strategies for the prevention and management of CMV.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2023

Recent Advances in the Prevention and Management of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Transplant Recipients: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Outcomes

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a frequent complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation (SOT) recipients. In addition to causing a variety of end-organ diseases, CMV infection is also associated with rejection after SOT and with graft versus host disease (GVHD) after HSCT. Antiviral prophylaxis is effective against direct and indirect effects of CMV infection. Preemptive therapy, more commonly used after HSCT, is based on surveillance, and targets therapy to patients at highest risk. Novel antiviral therapies with different mechanisms of action have recently become available giving healthcare professionals new options in the management of this infection. This program will take a look at those advances and provide up to date strategies for the management of CMV infection.

This webinar series on the evolving role of novel therapies in CMV infection management will take a close look at recent guideline updates, clinical data, and strategies for the prevention and management of CMV.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2023

A New Era in the Prevention and Management of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Transplant Recipients: Assessing the Evidence in Real-World Applications

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a frequent complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation (SOT) recipients. In addition to causing a variety of end-organ diseases, CMV infection is also associated with rejection after SOT and with graft versus host disease (GVHD) after HSCT. Antiviral prophylaxis is effective against direct and indirect effects of CMV infection. Preemptive therapy, more commonly used after HSCT, is based on surveillance, and targets therapy to patients at highest risk. Novel antiviral therapies with different mechanisms of action have recently become available giving healthcare professionals new options in the management of this infection. This program will take a look at those advances and provide up to date strategies for the management of CMV infection.

This webinar series on the evolving role of novel therapies in CMV infection management will take a close look at recent guideline updates, clinical data, and strategies for the prevention and management of CMV.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2023

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Paradigm in the Management of HIV: Individualized Therapy for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. HIV infects vital cells in the human immune system such as helper T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 persons in the United States aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection. Additionally, an estimated 6,955 people died from HIV and AIDS in 2018. Fortunately for patients with HIV, several new therapies have become available over the past few years, and more are set to become available soon.

Treatment regimens vary and carry important differences between therapeutic options that are clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. HIV treatment focuses on controlling the disease and living longer, healthier lives. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the use of HIV medicines to treat HIV infection. ART has evolved considerably over the past three decades. With many antiretroviral drugs, combinations, and classes available, health care providers have multiple choices regarding ART. While these choices provide clinicians with many useful options, they also lead to challenges. One of the biggest challenges for clinicians is individualizing the care of HIV-positive patients and understanding when certain ART therapies and strategies are appropriate, and when they are not. Numerous studies have shown that ART must be tailored to the individual patient and his or her abilities and diverse needs. Fortunately, new treatments have become available over the past couple of years offering physicians additional options to address the unmet needs of these HIV patients, including combination regimens. Additionally, more agents and combinations are now available for heavily pretreated patients. Options for HIV prevention and treatment continue to expand at a rapid pace. To improve outcomes for patients, clinicians working in healthcare settings must keep current with the latest treatments, guideline recommendations, strategies for individualizing therapy, and best practices for coordinating care and specialty referral.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Navigating Recent Advances in the Management of HIV: Optimal Treatment Strategies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. HIV infects vital cells in the human immune system such as helper T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 persons in the United States aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection. Additionally, an estimated 6,955 people died from HIV and AIDS in 2018. Fortunately for patients with HIV, several new therapies have become available over the past few years, and more are set to become available soon. With so many new options entering the treatment paradigm, it is critical that medical directors, practicing physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options and guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm and individualizing therapy, which will ultimately improve clinical and economic outcomes.

Treatment regimens vary and carry important differences between therapeutic options that are clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. HIV treatment focuses on controlling the disease and living longer, healthier lives. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the use of HIV medicines to treat HIV infection. ART has evolved considerably over the past three decades. With many antiretroviral drugs, combinations, and classes available, health care providers have multiple choices regarding ART. While these choices provide clinicians with many useful options, they also lead to challenges. One of the biggest challenges for clinicians is individualizing the care of HIV-positive patients and understanding when certain ART therapies and strategies are appropriate, and when they are not. Numerous studies have shown that ART must be tailored to the individual patient and his or her abilities and diverse needs. Fortunately, new treatments have become available over the past couple of years offering physicians additional options to address the unmet needs of these HIV patients, including combination regimens. Additionally, more agents and combinations are undergoing regulatory review that offer long acting benefits. Options for HIV prevention and treatment continue to expand at a rapid pace.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in Management of HIV

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Integrating the Latest Data and Guidelines in the Management of HIV: Strategies for Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in HIV: A Closer Look at the Role of Novel Long-Acting Injectable and Implantable ART Formulations

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in HIV: What Does Managed Care Need to Know About New and Emerging Therapies?

HIV is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 people in the US aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection and an estimated 6,955 people died in 2019. Fortunately, several new therapies have become available recently, and more are set to become available soon.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Turning the Tide on Serious Gram-negative Infections: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

Gram-negative bacteria represent an ongoing global healthcare challenge, with changing epidemiology and resistance patterns resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates among hospitalized patents. Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. Multidrug-resistant and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New antibiotics for preventing and managing these serious infections have recently been introduced, and other agents are in late stages of clinical development. These webinars will take a closer look what managed care professionals need to know about these new options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Optimizing Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Gram-negative Infections: Recent Advances for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Gram-negative bacteria represent an ongoing global healthcare challenge, with changing epidemiology and resistance patterns resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates among hospitalized patents. Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. Multidrug-resistant and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New antibiotics for preventing and managing these serious infections have recently been introduced, and other agents are in late stages of clinical development. These webinars will take a closer look what managed care professionals need to know about these new options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Turning the Tide on Serious Gram-negative Infections: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

Gram-negative bacteria represent an ongoing global healthcare challenge, with changing epidemiology and resistance patterns resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates among hospitalized patents. Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. Multidrug-resistant and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New antibiotics for preventing and managing these serious infections have recently been introduced, and other agents are in late stages of clinical development. These webinars will take a closer look what managed care professionals need to know about these new options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Prevention and Management of Recurrent C. difficile: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

The epidemiology and incidence of hospital- and community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past decade resulting in increased cases of initial and recurrent infection. Up to 25% of patients with an initial episode of CDI experience disease recurrence. Recurrent CDI is particularly challenging to manage.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Prevention and Management of Recurrent C. difficile Infection: Expert Perspectives for Improved Patient Outcomes

The epidemiology and incidence of hospital- and community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past decade resulting in increased cases of initial and recurrent infection. Up to 25% of patients with an initial episode of CDI experience disease recurrence. Recurrent CDI is particularly challenging to manage.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Prevention and Management of Recurrent C. difficile Infection: What Managed Care Needs to Know

The epidemiology and incidence of hospital- and community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past decade resulting in increased cases of initial and recurrent infection. Up to 25% of patients with an initial episode of CDI experience disease recurrence. Recurrent CDI is particularly challenging to manage.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Musculoskeletal & Rheumatology

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Landscape in Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes with Biomarkers and Individualized Management

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-lasting autoimmune disorder that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues. It typically results in warm, swollen, and painful joints, and pain and stiffness often worsen following rest. Most commonly, the wrist and hands are involved, with the same joints typically involved on both sides of the body. The disease may also affect other parts of the body, which results in a low red blood cell count, inflammation around the lungs, and inflammation around the heart. Fortunately for patients with RA, several new medications have become available recently. Diagnosis is done through examination, including x-rays and ultrasounds, and blood testing for certain indications and to rule out other possible causes for the symptoms. There is no cure for RA, treatment is to control the pain, during flair ups especially, and to prevent joint damage.

Treatment regimens vary and carry important differences between therapeutic options that are clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. An understanding of the pathogenesis of RA and the role of different treatment approaches, including current and emerging therapies, will assist healthcare providers in determining the best course of therapeutic management for optimal long-term patient outcomes. RA treatment focuses on controlling the disease and its symptoms. However, with all of the currently available non-biologic and biologic therapies, only about 1/3 of patients treated for RA ever achieve clinical remission. Fortunately, new and emerging treatment strategies have offered additional therapeutic options to address the unmet needs of these patients. Clinicians have recently been equipped with more treatment options, including new biologic DMARDs, which have demonstrated an improved efficacy and safety.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology ,

Neurological

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Alzheimer’s Disease: Expert Perspectives on the Role of Emerging Therapies

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Over time the disease destroys large areas of the brain, resulting in cellular loss and dysfunction, a gradual loss of memory, problems with reasoning or judgment, disorientation, difficulty in learning, loss of language skills, and decline in the ability to perform routine tasks. Although not all memory loss indicates Alzheimer’s disease, one in ten people over 65 years of age, and over half of those over 85 have Alzheimer’s disease. By the year 2050, over 15 million Americans may be affected with the disease. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $172 billion annually in the United States alone. However, advances in the science underlying Alzheimer’s are emerging at a rapid rate with a large number of potential agents undergoing clinical trials.

Currently, an autopsy or brain biopsy is the only way to make a definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Diagnosing Alzheimer’s requires careful medical evaluation, including medical history, mental status testing, physical and neurological exam, blood tests and brain imaging. PCPs are increasingly called on to provide care for cognitively impaired individuals, playing critical roles in detecting early symptoms of dementia, communicating with patients and caregivers about the disease, coordinating with specialists on multimodal therapeutic plans, and following up to tailor treatment, minimize complications, and head off medical crises. The importance of early diagnosis cannot be understated. As the use of biomarkers continues to grow, the potential for catching Alzheimer’s disease even earlier is crucial to improving outcomes. While there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease or a way to stop or slow its progression, there are pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic options that may help treat symptoms.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Slowing Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): Managed Care Strategies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the United States are living with ALS. It is a progressive disease in which the motor neurons eventually die. Mortality is usually the result of respiratory failure. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS. Fortunately for patients with ALS, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving medical directors and clinicians many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression in the ALS patient population. With new options expanding the treatment armamentarium in ALS, a knowledge gap has been created, making it imperative that managed care physician medical directors, practicing physicians, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals who manage ALS patient populations have a solid understanding of differing options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application.

As there is no current cure for ALS, management focuses on treating symptoms and providing supportive care, with the goal of improving quality of life and prolonging survival in patients. This care is best provided by multidisciplinary teams of healthcare professionals; attending a multidisciplinary ALS clinic is associated with longer survival, fewer hospitalizations, and improved quality of life as they have access to the most recent treatments and management tools. New agents have recently become available that have shown the ability to slow functional decline in ALS, giving providers and payers even more options to manage these populations and improve quality of life. It is for this reason that managed care physician medical directors, practicing physicians, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date on all of the available and emerging therapy options, the economic and quality of life burden that ALS presents, and strategies for improving patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Recent Therapeutic Approaches for Migraine Management: The Latest Developments in Diagnosis and Prevention

Migraine is a major neurological disease that affects more than 36 million men, women and children in the United States. The disease impacts 1 in 4 households, 1 in 5 women, 1 in 16 men, and 1 in 11 children in the United States. Migraine headache is the most common type of headache presented by patients that seek medical treatment, and the World Health Organization (WHO) has ranked migraine in the top fifteen most disabling medical conditions. In many patients with migraine headache, their pain is unrelieved, and recurrence of migraine is a common reason for patient dissatisfaction with treatment. Although approximately 38% of migraineurs need preventive therapy, only 3% to 13% currently use it. The fact that diagnosis is based entirely on clinical history poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, as migraine is only 1 of approximately 300 headache disorders. Although accurate diagnosis is needed for appropriate treatment, currently available migraine therapy is often inadequate. Fortunately for patients who suffer from migraine headaches, a new class of therapy has emerged that offers vastly improved efficacy and safety over traditional treatment regimens. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) monoclonal antibodies offer healthcare professionals a new and improved armamentarium in the treatment and prevention of migraines.

The diagnosis of a migraine is based on signs and symptoms. Neuroimaging tests are not necessary to diagnose migraine, but may be used to find other causes of headaches in those whose examination and history do not confirm a migraine diagnosis. It is believed that a substantial number of people with the condition remain undiagnosed, which stresses the importance of proper screening and diagnostic tools and strategies. Patients with frequent migraines and/or who experience functional disability need preventative migraine treatment. While traditional pharmaceutical intervention has worked adequately in the past, new and emerging options are available that have shown the ability to vastly improve outcomes, quality of life and adherence in migraine patients. CGRP monoclonal antibodies are specifically designed to bind to and inhibit the activity of CGRP that may prevent or significantly reduce the frequency of monthly migraine headache days in patients with episodic and chronic migraine and cluster headache. The role of CGRP in migraine has been verified by basic research. The peptide is present throughout the trigeminovascular system and in central brain regions. During spontaneous migraine attacks, jugular-venous blood concentrations of CGRP increase, and the recombinant human CGRP can induce a migraine attack. Monoclonal antibodies targeting CGRP have become available in the preventative management of migraine.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Evolving Treatment Paradigms in the Management of Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the United States, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. A number of factors must be considered when selecting a treatment regimen for patients with MS, including variations in clinical and MRI evidence of disease. Over the past decade, there have been numerous revisions to MS diagnostic criteria and the development of multiple new and emerging therapies. While the explosion of these emerging therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge that must be overcome through education. New options showing improved efficacy, safety and deliverability have recently been approved, which will change the treatment paradigm, and it is for this reason that medical directors, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be updated on emerging treatments and strategies in the management of relapsing MS.

Currently treatment is focused on disease-modifying agents, which helps lessen the frequency and severity of relapses, reduce lesions in the brain, and help slow or stop disability. At present time, only one-third to one-half of the 400,000 individuals in the US have received treatment with these disease-modifying agents. While this is not a cure for multiple sclerosis, disease-modifying treatments have greatly improved the quality of life for patients with MS. Many therapeutic and technological advances are helping people manage symptoms, which are highly variable from person to person. Recent years have witnessed remarkable progress in our understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) immunopathophysiology. These new insights have led to late-breaking evidence on treatment options that address unmet needs among patients with relapsing MS disease. It is imperative that medical directors, clinicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals are kept up to date on these emerging treatments for relapsing MS, so they can work together to improve patient compliance and select the appropriate therapy for each patient.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP): Expert Perspectives on Immunoglobulin Therapy

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. In CIDP, the myelin sheath, the protective covering of the nerves, is damaged. This may result in numbness or tingling, muscle weakness, fatigue, and other symptoms. CIDP effects can worsen over time, leading to significant activity limitations and a decreased quality of life. CIDP can occur at any age and is more common in men than in women. Approximately 30 percent of CIDP patients will progress to wheelchair dependence if not treated. In the U.S., it is estimated that the incidence of CIDP is up to two patients per 100,000 people each year, with a prevalence of 40,000 people affected. Despite available treatment options, many CIDP patients continue to struggle with daily disease and lifestyle challenges. Fortunately for these patients, novel immunoglobulin replacement therapies have recently become available that have shown improved efficacy and safety as a maintenance therapy in CIDP. With this new option comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, neurologists and nurse case managers as the treatment paradigm is growing.

First-line treatment for CIDP is currently intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and other treatments include corticosteroids (e.g. prednisone), and plasmapheresis (plasma exchange) which may be prescribed alone or in combination with an immunosuppressant drug. However, recent controlled studies show how subcutaneous immunoglobin (SCIG), which has only recently become available for patients with CIDP, appears to be as effective for CIDP treatment as IVIG in most patients, and with fewer systemic side effects. Effective and timely treatment of CIDP can greatly improve the quality of life and outcomes in CIDP patients
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Evolving Treatment Paradigms in the Management of Multiple Sclerosis: How New and Emerging Therapies are Changing the Treatment Landscape

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the United States, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. A number of factors must be considered when selecting a treatment regimen for patients with MS, including variations in clinical and MRI evidence of disease. Over the past decade, there have been numerous revisions to MS diagnostic criteria and the development of multiple new and emerging therapies. While the explosion of these emerging therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge that must be overcome through education. New options showing improved efficacy, safety and deliverability have recently been approved, which will change the treatment paradigm, and it is for this reason that medical directors, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be updated on emerging treatments and strategies in the management of relapsing MS.

Currently treatment is focused on disease-modifying agents, which helps lessen the frequency and severity of relapses, reduce lesions in the brain, and help slow or stop disability. At present time, only one-third to one-half of the 400,000 individuals in the US have received treatment with these disease-modifying agents. While this is not a cure for multiple sclerosis, disease-modifying treatments have greatly improved the quality of life for patients with MS. Many therapeutic and technological advances are helping people manage symptoms, which are highly variable from person to person. Recent years have witnessed remarkable progress in our understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) immunopathophysiology. These new insights have led to late-breaking evidence on treatment options that address unmet needs among patients with relapsing MS disease. Additionally, there are emerging agents that have recently become available that focus on sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. S1P-based therapeutics in clinical trials showed improved efficacy, safety and deliverability, which makes it critical that healthcare professionals are brought to date on the latest data. It is imperative that medical directors, clinicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals are kept up to date on these emerging treatments for relapsing MS, so they can work together to improve patient compliance and select the appropriate therapy for each patient.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Recent Advances in the Management of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): What Managed Care Needs to Know in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the United States are living with ALS. It is a progressive disease in which the motor neurons eventually die. Mortality is usually the result of respiratory failure. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS. Fortunately for patients with ALS, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving medical directors and clinicians many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression in the ALS patient population. With new options expanding the treatment armamentarium in ALS, a knowledge gap has been created, making it imperative that managed care physician medical directors, practicing physicians, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals who manage ALS patient populations have a solid understanding of differing options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application.

As there is no current cure for ALS, management focuses on treating symptoms and providing supportive care, with the goal of improving quality of life and prolonging survival in patients. This care is best provided by multidisciplinary teams of healthcare professionals; attending a multidisciplinary ALS clinic is associated with longer survival, fewer hospitalizations, and improved quality of life as they have access to the most recent treatments and management tools. New agents have recently become available that have shown the ability to slow functional decline in ALS, giving providers and payers even more options to manage these populations and improve quality of life. It is for this reason that managed care physician medical directors, practicing physicians, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals are brought up to date on all of the available and emerging therapy options, the economic and quality of life burden that ALS presents, and strategies for improving patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Improving Outcomes in Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Emerging Treatment Advances and Recommendations

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Over time the disease destroys large areas of the brain, resulting in cellular loss and dysfunction, a gradual loss of memory, problems with reasoning or judgment, disorientation, difficulty in learning, loss of language skills, and decline in the ability to perform routine tasks. Although not all memory loss indicates Alzheimer’s disease, one in ten people over 65 years of age, and over half of those over 85 have Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, 26 million people worldwide have this dementia. By the year 2050, over 15 million Americans may be affected with the disease. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $172 billion annually in the United States alone. However, advances in the science underlying Alzheimer’s are emerging at a rapid rate with a large number of potential agents undergoing clinical trials.

Diagnosing Alzheimer’s requires careful medical evaluation, including medical history, mental status testing, physical and neurological exam, blood tests and brain imaging. As the use of biomarkers continues to grow, the potential for catching Alzheimer’s disease even earlier is crucial to improving outcomes. While there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease or a way to stop or slow its progression, there are pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic options that may help treat symptoms. Understanding available options can help individuals living with the disease and their caregivers to cope with symptoms and improve a patient’s quality of life. There is one emerging treatment that has shown high-dose, long-duration exposure can modify the disease process and provide clinical benefit to patients with Alzheimer’s. The research has now been developed to a point where scientists can look beyond treating symptoms to think about addressing underlying disease processes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Managing Clinical and Cost Outcomes in Multiple Sclerosis: Utilizing Data to Make Informed Decisions in Managed Care

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately one million cases throughout the United States. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. Effective and timely treatment of MS can greatly improve the quality of life in MS patients. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, including therapies that have recently become available, managed care professionals are being challenged to make informed decisions in their organizations and provide the correct treatment options that are available to patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

A Closer Look into the Latest Data in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: Utilizing Recent Evidence to Make Informed Decisions

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately one million cases throughout the United States. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. Effective and timely treatment of MS can greatly improve the quality of life in MS patients. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, including therapies that have recently become available, managed care professionals are being challenged to make informed decisions in their organizations and provide the correct treatment options that are available to patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Multiple Sclerosis: What Does Managed Care Need to Know About New and Emerging Therapeutics?

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately one million cases throughout the United States. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. Effective and timely treatment of MS can greatly improve the quality of life in MS patients. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, including therapies that have recently become available, managed care professionals are being challenged to make informed decisions in their organizations and provide the correct treatment options that are available to patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis: Strategies for Managing Adverse Events Associated with New and Emerging Therapies

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately one million cases throughout the United States. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. Effective and timely treatment of MS can greatly improve the quality of life in MS patients. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, including therapies that have recently become available, managed care professionals are being challenged to make informed decisions in their organizations and provide the correct treatment options that are available to patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2023

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): What Managed Care Needs to Know about New and Emerging Therapies

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $172 billion annually in the US alone. Fortunately for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, new and emerging therapies, including anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) monoclonal antibodies, are undergoing late stage clinical trials or have been submitted for regulatory review. This program will provide strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and highlight the role of managed care professionals in making informed decisions on these new and emerging therapies that will improve quality of life, significantly reduce clinical decline, and minimize costs throughout the healthcare system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

Benefit Design and Coordinated Care in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): What Managed Care Needs to Know about Emerging Therapies and Reducing Clinical Decline

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $172 billion annually in the US alone. Fortunately for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, new and emerging therapies, including anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) monoclonal antibodies, are undergoing late stage clinical trials or have been submitted for regulatory review. This program will provide strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and highlight the role of managed care professionals in making informed decisions on these new and emerging therapies that will improve quality of life, significantly reduce clinical decline, and minimize costs throughout the healthcare system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): Optimizing Adverse Event Management and Imaging for Emerging Therapies

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $172 billion annually in the US alone. Fortunately for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, new and emerging therapies, including anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) monoclonal antibodies, are undergoing late stage clinical trials or have been submitted for regulatory review. This program will provide strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and highlight the role of managed care professionals in making informed decisions on these new and emerging therapies that will improve quality of life, significantly reduce clinical decline, and minimize costs throughout the healthcare system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Emerging Therapies in the Management of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): What Does Recent Clinical Trial Data Have to Say?

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $172 billion annually in the US alone. Fortunately for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, new and emerging therapies, including anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) monoclonal antibodies, are undergoing late stage clinical trials or have been submitted for regulatory review. This program will provide strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and highlight the role of managed care professionals in making informed decisions on these new and emerging therapies that will improve quality of life, significantly reduce clinical decline, and minimize costs throughout the healthcare system.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

Treating Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy With Immunoglobulin: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. In CIDP, the myelin sheath, the protective covering of the nerves, is damaged. This may result in numbness or tingling, muscle weakness, fatigue, and other symptoms. CIDP effects can worsen over time, leading to significant activity limitations and a decreased quality of life. CIDP can occur at any age and is more common in men than in women. Approximately 30 percent of CIDP patients will progress to wheelchair dependence if not treated. Fortunately for these patients, novel immunoglobulin replacement therapies have recently become available that have shown improved efficacy and safety as a maintenance therapy in CIDP.

First-line treatment for CIDP is currently intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and other treatments include corticosteroids (e.g. prednisone), and plasmapheresis (plasma exchange) which may be prescribed alone or in combination with an immunosuppressant drug. However, recent controlled studies show how subcutaneous immunoglobin (SCIG), which has only recently become available for patients with CIDP, appears to be as effective for CIDP treatment as IVIG in most patients, and with fewer systemic side effects. Effective and timely treatment of CIDP can greatly improve the quality of life and outcomes in CIDP patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Insomnia: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Management Paradigm

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. The dangers of insomnia can affect more than just a person’s mood as people and if not treated properly can lead to other effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration problems, memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease. About 25% of Americans experience acute insomnia each year with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

Integrating the Latest Data and Guidelines in the Management of Insomnia: Utilizing New Therapies for Optimal Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. The dangers of insomnia can affect more than just a person’s mood as people and if not treated properly can lead to other effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration problems, memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease. About 25% of Americans experience acute insomnia each year with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Insomnia: Strategies for Managing Treatment Related Adverse Events Associated with Newer Therapies

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. The dangers of insomnia can affect more than just a person’s mood as people and if not treated properly can lead to other effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration problems, memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease. About 25% of Americans experience acute insomnia each year with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

What Managed Care Needs to Know about New Therapies in the Management of Insomnia

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. The dangers of insomnia can affect more than just a person’s mood as people and if not treated properly can lead to other effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration problems, memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease. About 25% of Americans experience acute insomnia each year with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2022

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease and is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the United States, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. In many cases, MS may not be diagnosed for months to years after the onset of symptoms. Some strategies for diagnosis include a careful medical history, a neurologic exam and various tests, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spinal fluid analysis. A number of factors must be considered when selecting a treatment regimen for patients with MS, including variations in clinical and MRI evidence of disease. Currently treatment is focused on disease-modifying agents, which helps lessen the frequency and severity of relapses, reduce lesions in the brain, and help slow or stop disability. Clinical data shows these agents have the ability to improve outcomes in both safety and efficacy as it relates to the management of patients with MS, especially in patients that haven’t responded to previous treatments. Effective and timely treatment of relapsing MS can greatly improve the quality of life in MS patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Frontiers for Neuromuscular Blockade Use and Reversal: Addressing Challenges for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are used in many surgical procedures and have enabled new surgical advances. The expanded landscape of NMB reversal drugs allows for fast and complete neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal and the reduction of postoperative complications from residual block. In the United States, neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and sugammadex are the primary agents for pharmacologic antagonism of NMBAs. While neostigmine and an anticholinergic have been available for decades, sugammadex has only recently become available. This webinar will take a close look at these options and what managed care needs to know about NMB and reversal in a variety of surgeries and clinical settings in which the use of NMB reversal agents played a significant role in the patients’ clinical outcome.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

New Frontiers for Neuromuscular Blockade Use and Reversal: Addressing Challenges for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are used in many surgical procedures and have enabled new surgical advances. The expanded landscape of NMB reversal drugs allows for fast and complete neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal and the reduction of postoperative complications from residual block. In the United States, neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and sugammadex are the primary agents for pharmacologic antagonism of NMBAs. While neostigmine and an anticholinergic have been available for decades, sugammadex has only recently become available. This webinar will take a close look at these options and what managed care needs to know about NMB and reversal in a variety of surgeries and clinical settings in which the use of NMB reversal agents played a significant role in the patients’ clinical outcome.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

New Frontiers for Neuromuscular Blockade Use and Reversal: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Paradigm

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are used in many surgical procedures and have enabled new surgical advances. The expanded landscape of NMB reversal drugs allows for fast and complete neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal and the reduction of postoperative complications from residual block. In the United States, neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and sugammadex are the primary agents for pharmacologic antagonism of NMBAs. While neostigmine and an anticholinergic have been available for decades, sugammadex has only recently become available. This webinar will take a close look at these options and what managed care needs to know about NMB and reversal in a variety of surgeries and clinical settings in which the use of NMB reversal agents played a significant role in the patients’ clinical outcome.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

ALS Series Webinars: New Horizons in the Management of ALS: Leveraging Emerging Therapeutic Breakthroughs to Make Informed Decisions

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in ALS: New Insights on Optimizing Adverse Event Management and Patient Health Maintenance

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in ALS: What Managed Care Needs to Know about Novel Therapies

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Available and Emerging Therapies in the Management of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

Optimizing Treatment Regimens, Switching and Sequencing in Multiple Sclerosis: Leveraging Data to Make Informed Decisions

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into the Latest Data in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: Leveraging Recent Evidence to Make Informed Decisions

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Improving Quality of Life and Patient Adherence in Multiple Sclerosis: New Insights on Induction, Escalation, Oral Agents, and Monitoring

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Multiple Sclerosis: What Does Managed Care Need to Know?

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Ophthalmology

Reducing Treatment Burden and Improving Outcomes in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD): What Managed Care Needs to Know about Emerging Therapies

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

Reducing Treatment Burden with Emerging Therapies in the Management of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD): Comparing Recent Clinical Trial Outcomes

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

Improving Quality of Life in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD): Evaluating New Dosing Options and Mechanisms for Delivery of Agents

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

What Managed Care Needs to Know about Emerging Therapies and Treatment Frequency in Management of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD)

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Pulmonary

Treatment Advances in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Recent Guidelines and Evidence to Support Optimal Patient Outcomes

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial lung disease (ILD) of unknown origin characterized by progressive lung scarring. It is the most common of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, and is a devastating disease associated with irreversible destruction of the lung. The scarring in the lungs gets progressively worse and it makes it difficult for patients to breathe as well as keep adequate levels of oxygen in the bloodstream. The condition affects approximately 3 million people worldwide and has a substantial burden to patients, their families, and the overall healthcare system. Patients with IPF can progress slowly with the right treatment, while others experience rapid lung decline, which presents several diagnostic and management-related challenges. IPF typically has a poor prognosis and the median survival rate is less than four years or fewer from diagnosis. Most patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis present with a gradual onset, which makes it difficult to diagnosis early.

In recent years, updated guidelines for the management of IPF were published to provide clinicians and healthcare providers the best management strategies for a proper diagnosis of IPF. The diagnosis of IPF in most cases involves an in-depth review of both medication and environmental exposure histories followed by a high-resolution computed tomography scan (HRCT). Depending on the results of the HRCT, an analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or surgical lung biopsy may be performed, and with a proper evaluation of the HRCT results combined with a histopathology pattern, confirms a diagnosis of IPF. Healthcare professionals are constantly looking at ways to diagnose the disease much earlier to improve outcomes. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, the goals of IPF management are to ameliorate symptoms, improve health status, preserve lung function, maintain adequate oxygenation with supplemental oxygen, minimize adverse events of therapy, reduce the frequency of acute exacerbations and, ideally, improve overall patient care and outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Chronic Cough: A Closer Look at the Role of Emerging Therapies

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Urology

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Additional Topics

Meeting the Challenges of Integrating Biosimilars in the Healthcare Treatment Paradigm

Biosimilar products are biologic products that are highly similar to already approved biologic drugs developed for various indications. While biosimilars have some differences compared with their reference products, they are mandated to produce identical similarity from their reference biologics in terms of clinical safety and efficacy. As such, these biosimilar products promise to foster unprecedented access to a wide range of life-saving biologics while ensuring a rise in healthcare access and market sustainability. Biosimilar products also need to include supporting clinical and non-clinical data in certain situations where comparability data is insufficient in assuring positive drug interchangeability.

Biosimilars are expected to have a significant impact on healthcare as they revolutionize the treatments of many disease states. According to a current market forecast, global sales of biosimilars will exceed $19 billion by 2023, up from just $2.5 billion in 2017, driven by their cost-effectiveness and the patent expiration of a number of biologics. Biosimilars have the potential to reduce healthcare costs and expand patient access to biologic therapies. With biosimilars becoming more prevalent there are still a unique set of challenges for regulators, clinicians, payers, and patients. Some of these challenges show the need for better clinical practice guidelines to direct the use of biosimilars and the interchangeability of these products compared with their biologic originator drugs.

Once a biosimilar is approved for use by the FDA, it can be approved for additional indications (conditions) based on a concept called extrapolation of data. If the data collected on the biosimilar in preclinical work shows the same clinical result as the original product, additional clinical trials do not have to be conducted. Physicians and other healthcare providers are the most important stakeholders for biosimilar acceptance and need to be continually educated about the multiple aspects of biosimilars, including the underlying scientific principles, the development and regulatory pathways, how to use them in clinical practice, as well as educating their patients about their value. Clinicians and physicians are now starting to use their knowledge to make informed and appropriate decisions, so patients understand the biosimilar benefits, limitations, core concepts and the accessibility. These goals allow for effective strategies to be put into place that will help overcome potential challenges within the treatment and management plans for biosimilar use.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Preparing for a New Era in Chronic Cough Management: Managed Care Considerations on the Role of New and Emerging Therapies is a two-part webinar series

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2023

Preparing for a New Era in Chronic Cough Management: Managed Care Considerations on the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2023

Preparing for a New Era in Chronic Cough Management: A Closer Look at the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2023

Navigating Current and Emerging Approaches in the Treatment and Management of Hemophilia

Hemophilia is usually an inherited disorder and is caused by a defect in one of the X chromosomes. The number of people living with hemophilia is unknown; it’s believed that around 1 in 5,000 people are born with it every year. There are a couple of different types, but 9 out of 10 people with hemophilia have type A and are missing the clotting factor VIII. There are three levels of hemophilia, but 7 out of 10 sufferers of hemophilia are diagnosed with severe, which is having less than 1% of the normal clotting factor. Hemophilia is diagnosed through blood tests to see how long blood takes to clot, which clotting factor is low or missing, and the severity of the hemophilia. The main treatment is replacement therapy; concentrates of clotting factor VIII are dripped or injected into a vein. This concentrated clotting factor can be made from human blood or not. Having regular treatments is referred to as prophylactic, or preventive therapy, and helps to prevent bleeding episodes. There is also demand therapy, where the replacement therapy is done on an as-need basis. While demand therapy is less expensive, there is a risk that the delay in treatment can cause damage to joints and muscles.

Replacement therapy can be taught to a capable person, and infusions can be done at home, making for quicker treatment with less stress, less visits to the doctor, and less cost. However, it does require precise patient education and follow up. Another possibility for replacement therapy is having a vein access device implanted, which makes access easier. These devices can get infected and need proper care. Antibodies are the biggest complication for replacement therapy. These antibodies, or inhibitors, develop in around 20% of people with hemophilia A. This can be treated though either larger doses of the regular clotting factor, or sometimes by switching clotting factors. Novel treatments include longer lasting agents that will cut down on the number of infusions done per year, thus having the possibility of increasing patient compliance and decreasing the possibility of inhibitors forming.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Copyright permissions

To the best of our knowledge permissions for use of any copyright materials was received by each individual presenter. NAMCP/AAMCN does receive permissions to record, transcribe and publish materials (slides and audio) from each speaker. These permissions are on file at NAMCP headquarters.

For more information contact Jeremy Williams at 804-527-1905 or jwilliams@namcp.org.
Disclaimer

NAMCP and or this website does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. NAMCP does not endorse or imply endorsement of the content on any linked website. This website is to be used as an informational resource. With any health related concern, consult with your physician or healthcare professional.