Health Management

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology, Additional Topics

Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine

Addressing the Challenges of HPV Vaccination and Prevention of HPV-related Cancers in Young and Older Adults

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various types of cancer. An estimated 79 million people in the United States are infected with some type of HPV, and approximately 50% of new infections occur in individuals before the age of 24. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, HPV vaccination coverage remains low. There are various reasons why the vaccination rates are low, including patients’ and/or parents’ lack of knowledge about HPV and their discomfort with talking to health care providers about sexual activity, affordability, among other reasons.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2022

Addressing the Challenges of HPV Vaccination and Prevention of HPV-related Cancers in Young and Older Adults

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various types of cancer. An estimated 79 million people in the United States are infected with some type of HPV, and approximately 50% of new infections occur in individuals before the age of 24. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, HPV vaccination coverage remains low. There are various reasons why the vaccination rates are low, including patients’ and/or parents’ lack of knowledge about HPV and their discomfort with talking to health care providers about sexual activity, affordability, among other reasons.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2022

Addressing the Challenges of HPV Vaccination and Prevention of HPV-related Cancers: Managed Care Considerations and Updates

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various types of cancer. An estimated 79 million people in the United States are infected with some type of HPV, and approximately 50% of new infections occur in individuals before the age of 24. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, HPV vaccination coverage remains low. There are various reasons why the vaccination rates are low, including patients’ and/or parents’ lack of knowledge about HPV and their discomfort with talking to health care providers about sexual activity, affordability, among other reasons.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2022

Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations is a two-part live webinar series that will provide attendees with the latest information on immunizations, costs, burdens and strategies to increase the success of immunizations, and more importantly, patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Closing Gaps in Adolescent Immunizations: Expert Perspectives for Improved Patient Outcomes

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes. Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations is a two-part live webinar series that will provide attendees with the latest information on immunizations, costs, burdens and strategies to increase the success of immunizations, and more importantly, patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Closing Gaps in Adult Immunizations: Overcoming Barriers to Effective Practices

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This two-part webinar series will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes. Closing Gaps in Adolescent and Adult Immunizations is a two-part live webinar series that will provide attendees with the latest information on immunizations, costs, burdens and strategies to increase the success of immunizations, and more importantly, patient outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

Behavioral Health

Recent Updates in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: Overcoming Barriers through Personalized Care

Major depression is a debilitating condition that nearly 20% of the general population in the United States will experience at some point in their life. With appropriate treatment, 70-80% of individuals with major depressive disorder can achieve a significant reduction in symptoms, although as many as 50% of patients may not respond to the initial treatment trial. In addition, more than 80% of patients with depression have a medical comorbidity. Comorbidities or complications that can come from MDD include alcohol abuse or substance abuse, type 2 diabetes, isolation, work and personal conflicts, and an increased chance of suicide. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), a diagnosis of clinical depression requires the presence of depressed mood, a loss of pleasure and interest, decreased energy, changes in sleep patterns, and feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness, or guilt for a period of at least 2 weeks. It is important to assess the overall severity of depressive symptoms because symptom severity correlates with suicide risk. A focused severity assessment for hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and psychotic symptoms is recommended; these symptoms independently increase the risk for suicide.

Treatment is based on severity of depression, and episode types. Treatment may be multi-faceted, combining medication with psychotherapy. Treatment may change several times as different medications affect people in different ways. There are several treatment methods for major depression disorder. These approaches include psychotherapy, antidepressant medications, electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), and other somatic therapies. However, ECT is generally avoided, except in extreme circumstances, in favor of psychotherapy and antidepressants. Antidepressant treatments include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, atypical and tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other medications. Combination therapies, including multiple pharmacological actions, can affect multiple monoamine targets which can produce greater efficacy. While there are many options out there, the need to personalize a treatment plan for each individual patient is important as the ultimate goal of care providers is to move patients suffering from MDD to remission, then recovery, and to avoid a relapse. While this alone is a challenge for clinicians, it becomes even more difficult in patients with cardiovascular disease risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia. Further complicating matters are the risks associated with some medications used to treat depression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2021

Strategies for Improving Patient Outcomes through Optimal Treatment and Management of Major Depressive Disorder

Major depression is a debilitating condition that nearly 350 million people worldwide will experience at some point in their life. With appropriate treatment, only 70-80% of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) achieve a significant reduction in symptoms while as many as 50% of patients do not respond to initial treatment. In addition, more than 80% of patients with depression have a medical comorbidity or complication that often derive from alcohol or substance abuse, type 2 diabetes, isolation, work and personal conflicts, and an increased chance of suicide.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), a diagnosis of clinical depression requires the presence of depressed mood, a loss of pleasure and interest, decreased energy, changes in sleep patterns, and feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness, or guilt for a period of at least 2 weeks. Symptoms leave the patient with significant distress and impair their ability to function. Measurement-based assessment tools have helped to quantify the degree of depression; however, these tools continue to be underutilized in everyday practice. It is important to assess the overall severity of depressive symptoms as symptom severity correlates with suicide risk. Several treatment methods for MDD include psychotherapy, antidepressant medications, electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), and somatic therapies. Antidepressant treatments include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, atypical and tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and other medications. Combination therapies, including multiple pharmacological actions can affect multiple monoamine targets which can produce greater efficacy. While there are many options, the need to personalize a treatment plan for each individual patient is important to move patients suffering from MDD to remission, then recovery, and to avoid a relapse.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

 

Chronic Illnesses

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology, Additional Topics

AutoImmune

Implementing Expert Treatment Strategies in the Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, frequently progressive condition that affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States. This lifelong, systemic autoimmune illness often strikes patients at a young age and must be managed across a lifetime. The diagnosis of IBD is most commonly based on imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization, which may also include a combination of endoscopy and histopathology. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of IBD patients. The treatment goal for IBD is to reduce the inflammation, in hopes of achieving reduced symptoms and possibly remission. Immediate goals are to control the symptoms, induction of remission, and to help improve a patient’s quality of life, while long-term goals include maintenance of a corticosteroid-free clinical remission, mucosal healing, endoscopic remission, prevention or cure of complications, restoration, and maintenance of proper nutrition. The first step for IBD treatment is aminosalicylates, which are useful for treating flares of IBD and for maintaining remission. There is also the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections that may result from abscesses or fistulas. Corticosteroids can be used, as they are rapid-acting anti-inflammatory agents, are indicated for acute flares of disease only and have no role in the maintenance of remission. Immunomodulators have a slower onset of action and work to reduce patients’ overactive immune system but unlike corticosteroids, they can be used as a long-term treatment. And the fifth way to treat IBD is with biologics, which are proteins that stop certain molecules in the body from causing inflammation in the GI tract. These are usually prescribed to those living with moderate to severe cases of IBD who have not responded to other types of treatment.

Advances in IBD treatment have improved outcomes for many patients but personalizing therapy and predicting response to therapy continues to be a big challenge. This has led to underutilization of effective regimens, undertreatment, and suboptimal outcomes. Addressing new and emerging clinical decision support tools can help providers bridge this gap by predicting individualized disease complication risk and appropriate responses to therapy. Currently, there are several approved biologics and small molecules available through the FDA and other regulatory organizations around the world. One of these treatments is the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Another treatment pathway is blocking interleukin (IL)-12 and -23 through the use of ustekinumab. A completely different mechanism is blocking the adhesion molecules to the integrin inhibitors. Then, more recently there have been advances in the first oral agents which consist of the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. New updates in these treatments, as well as the presence of biologic therapies, has changed goals and expectations of inflammatory bowel disease management and gives patients a better chance of achieving remission.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Innovative Approaches for Advanced Treatment and Management of Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating disease that may affect up to 1 million adults in the United States, affecting men and women equally. Psoriatic arthritis is a progressive, inflammatory disease that is associated with a number of dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations. Patients can experience extreme pain and joint damage that may affect their quality of life, physical function, and ability to work. Symptoms include fatigue, joint inflammation, and potentially progressive joint damage. Diagnosing psoriatic arthritis can be very complex with the most critical factor being the absence of validated criteria for identifying and classifying cases that will help diagnose the disease. The standard diagnostic measures are based on history, a physical exam and x-ray features, so establishing the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms associated in both the skin and joints, and by ruling out more common inflammatory arthritis, can be very helpful.

The past few years have seen a number of treatments introduced for psoriatic arthritis. Along with symptomatic treatments, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and local corticosteroid injections into joints, there are also the oral small molecules (OSMs) for treatment. The Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors have been available for nearly 20 years and continue to be a viable option for patients. More recently key cytokines in the psoriatic disease pathophysiology have been introduced and they include Janus kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STATs) as well as are the interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, IL-22 and IL-23 pathway inhibitors. These newer biologic treatments target some of these key cytokines to treat psoriatic disease. Clinicians need to be able to incorporate these new approaches into treatment paradigms, considering both safety and efficacy, by being educated with appropriate management strategies that will guide treatment decisions for patients with psoriatic arthritis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Developments in the Treatment and Management of Psoriasis: Key Considerations for Improving Outcomes

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million of the population in the United States. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. The disease most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumboscaral areas of the body. Psoriasis is a complex disease to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves on quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. The under diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis continues to be a serious concern. Once psoriasis is diagnosed through a physical examination and a skin biopsy, treatment of the disease will depend on which type of psoriasis, where it is, and the severity of it. Newer treatments, such as biologics, work by inhibiting different types of cytokines while the early biologics work by inhibiting tumor necrosis (TNF)-alpha, a protein broadly involved in inflammation. Newer biologics are more targeted to the inflammatory pathways involved in psoriasis, which works by blocking two proteins — interleukin-17 and -23. These newer agents have been shown to be effective in treating psoriasis and could also be safer given their more specific action on the immune system. There are also newer non-biologic systemic treatments for psoriasis and they do not directly inhibit inflammatory cytokines and is thought to have no increased risk of infection; however, it is generally less effective in treating psoriasis. Recent research indicates that both IL-23 and IL-17 play important roles in the development of psoriatic plaques. Treatments that inhibit IL-23 and IL-17 have shown promising data in safety and efficacy in clinical trials of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Recent breakthroughs, and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis, have been translated into targeted and highly effective therapies providing fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases with a dominant IL-23/Th17 axis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Chronic Cough With Unexplained Cause: Emerging Therapies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2022

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Chronic Cough With Unexplained Causes

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2022

What Managed Care Needs to Know About Chronic Cough: Novel Therapies for Improved Outcomes

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies. This educational activity will review the burden of chronic cough, discuss the current recommendations for the management of patients with chronic cough, and evaluate the latest clinical data regarding emerging pharmacotherapies for the treatment of patients with refractory chronic cough.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to September 1, 2022

Navigating the Treatment Landscape to Improve Outcomes in Psoriasis: Essential Strategies for Proper Management

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million of the population in the United States. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. The main disease activity leading to psoriasis occurs in the epidermis, the top five layers of the skin. The disease most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumboscaral areas of the body. Many of the patients are not receiving the appropriate treatment discussed in the current guidelines and standards of care. Psoriasis is a complex disease to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves on quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. The under diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis continues to be a serious concern

Once psoriasis is diagnosed through a physical examination and a skin biopsy, treatment of the disease will depend on which type of psoriasis, where it is, and the severity of it. Newer biologics are more targeted to the inflammatory pathways involved in psoriasis, which works by blocking two proteins — interleukin-17 and -23. These newer agents have been shown to be effective in treating psoriasis and could also be safer given their more specific action on the immune system. Treatments that inhibit IL-23 and IL-17 have shown promising data in safety and efficacy in clinical trials of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Recent breakthroughs, and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis, have been translated into targeted and highly effective therapies.These new options have shown improved efficacy and safety in psoriasis, and healthcare professionals must be educated on these agents and the potential risks that come along with any treatment option.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2021

Confronting the Clinical and Economic Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

A Deep Dive into Emerging Therapies in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: Managed Care Considerations on Recent Clinical Data in an Evolving Treatment Landscape

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

Reducing the Economic Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: What Managed Care Needs to Know to About the Changing Paradigm

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

A Closer Look at the Clinical, Economic and Developmental Impact of Atopic Dermatitis: Strategies to Improve Patient Adherence, Quality of Life, Costs and Work Productivity

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent itching that can severely affect quality of life. This condition evolves from a combination of skin barrier defects and immune-mediated responses involving activated T-helper cells and related cytokines. Fortunately for patients with this disease, several new treatments have recently become available, and more are on the horizon, including JAK inhibitors, that have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

Recent Developments in the Treatment and Management of Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a progressive, inflammatory disease that is associated with a number of dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations. Patients can experience extreme pain and joint damage that may affect their quality of life, physical function, and ability to work. Symptoms include fatigue, joint inflammation, and potentially progressive joint damage. Diagnosing psoriatic arthritis can be very complex with the most critical factor being the absence of validated criteria for identifying and classifying cases that will help diagnose the disease. The standard diagnostic measures are based on history, a physical exam and x-ray features, so establishing the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms associated in both the skin and joints, and by ruling out more common inflammatory arthritis, can be very helpful. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis can sometimes be delayed or missed by primary care providers and other healthcare professionals. The past few years have seen a number of treatments introduced for psoriatic arthritis. Along with symptomatic treatments, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and local corticosteroid injections into joints, there are also the oral small molecules (OSMs) for treatment. The Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors have been available for nearly 20 years and continue to be a viable option for patients. More recently key cytokines in the psoriatic disease pathophysiology have been introduced and they include Janus kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STATs) as well as are the interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, IL-22 and IL-23 pathway inhibitors. These newer biologic treatments target some of these key cytokines to treat psoriatic disease.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2021

New Advances in Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Expert Strategies for Optimal Management

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, frequently progressive condition that affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States. This lifelong, systemic autoimmune illness often strikes patients at a young age and must be managed across a lifetime. The diagnosis of IBD is most commonly based on imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization, which may also include a combination of endoscopy and histopathology. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of IBD patients. The treatment goal for IBD is to reduce the inflammation, in hopes of achieving reduced symptoms and possibly remission. Immediate goals are to control the symptoms, induction of remission, and to help improve a patient’s quality of life, while long-term goals include maintenance of a corticosteroid-free clinical remission, mucosal healing, endoscopic remission, prevention or cure of complications, restoration, and maintenance of proper nutrition. The first step for IBD treatment is aminosalicylates, which are useful for treating flares of IBD and for maintaining remission. There are also the uses of antibiotics that treat bacterial infections that may result from abscesses or fistulas. Corticosteroids can be used and they are rapid-acting anti-inflammatory agents and are indicated for acute flares of disease only and have no role in the maintenance of remission. Immunomodulators have a slower onset of action and work to reduce patients’ overactive immune system but unlike corticosteroids, they can be used as a long-term treatment. And the fifth way to treat IBD is with biologics, which are proteins that stop certain molecules in the body from causing inflammation in the GI tract. These are usually prescribed to those living with moderate to severe cases of IBD who haven’t responded to other types of treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to May 1, 2021

Novel Treatment Approaches in Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Expert Perspectives on an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-lasting autoimmune disorder that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues. It typically results in warm, swollen, and painful joints, and pain and stiffness often worsen following rest. Most commonly, the wrist and hands are involved, with the same joints typically involved on both sides of the body. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), it is estimated that over 1.3 million people suffer from RA in the United States. The disease may also affect other parts of the body, which results in a low red blood cell count, inflammation around the lungs, and inflammation around the heart. Fortunately for patients with RA, several new medications have become available recently that have shown improved efficacy and safety and offer options for those who are intolerant to anti-TNF therapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2021

Improving the Clinical and Economic Burden of Ankylosing Spondylitis: Targeting IL17/IL-23 Pathways for Optimized Patient Outcomes

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.

This webinar series on integrating IL-17 and IL-23 therapies into the treatment paradigm will provide attendees with updated education on these novel treatment options, emerging value equations, the limitations of established treatment options, and recent clinical data on these new agents to optimize the management of patients with AS.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Managed Care Insights on IL-17/23 Inhibitors

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

A Closer Look at IL-17 and IL-23 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis: Individualizing Therapy for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Strategies for Managing Treatment Related Adverse Events Associated with IL-17 Inhibitors

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Patients with AS suffer from debilitating pain and joint fusion that severely limits their mobility and functional capacity. It is estimated that AS affects approximately 1.6 million people in the US. Due to an aging population, declining number of rheumatologists, and limited access to care, care for patients with AS is suboptimal and costly. Fortunately for patients with this disease, recent advances in pathogenesis have led to an increased understanding of the disease, which has subsequently led to the development of novel targeted agents shown to slow its progression, including options targeting IL-17/IL-23 pathways.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to April 1, 2022

Recent Treatment Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Greater Outcomes through Personalized Approaches

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, frequently progressive condition that affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States, with as many as 70,000 new cases diagnosed each year. This lifelong, systemic autoimmune illness often strikes patients at a young age and must be managed across a lifetime. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of IBD patients. There is no cure for IBD, and the immediate treatment goal is to decrease inflammation in order to reduce and control symptoms. Long-term treatment goals include reaching clinical remission and maintenance through mucosal healing, preventing further complications, and ultimately improving patient quality of life. Several treatment options are available and emerging therapies are currently being developed. Aminosalicylates are the mainstay of first line therapy in treating IBD and are useful for healing flares and maintaining remission. Antibiotics are available to treat bacterial infections, corticosteroids are rapid-acting anti-inflammatory agents that are indicated for acute flares of disease, and immunomodulators have a slower onset of action and work to reduce patients’ overactive immune system. The most recent advances in IBD therapy include biologics, which are proteins that stop certain molecules in the body from causing inflammation in the GI tract. These are usually prescribed to patients living with moderate to severe cases of IBD who haven’t responded to other types of treatment. Advances in these treatments and the presence of biologic therapies are changing goals and expectations of IBD management while providing patients a better chance of achieving remission and improving quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2021

Addressing the Challenges of Psoriasis Management: Optimal Treatment Strategies for Improved Patient Outcomes

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million Americans, or just over 2%, of the US population. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. This under diagnosed condition most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumbosacral areas of the body. Psoriasis is complex to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. Co-morbidities associated with the disease include psoriatic arthritis, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, obesity and more. Psoriasis is estimated to cost $135 billion a year (to include direct and indirect figures) however early diagnosis and treatment can reduce the economic burden. Several traditional treatment options are available ranging from prescribed or over the counter topical treatments, phototherapy, and oral or injected systemic agents. Thankfully novel targeted small molecule medications and biologics have recently become available. Biologics are administered through injection or intravenously and target specific areas of the immune system. These therapies have proven to be efficacious and have demonstrated a significant safety advance over traditional systemic therapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Immunoglobulin Replacement in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in PIDD: Strategies for Improving Administration and Managing Adverse Events

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in PIDD: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy?

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Informed Decision-Making in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): Expert Strategies on Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Some affect a single part of the immune system; others may affect one or more components of the system. And while the diseases may differ, they all share one common feature: each result from a defect in one of the functions of the body’s normal immune system. Fortunately for patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving medical directors and clinicians many more options in managing the PIDD patient population. Leading the way in this quickly growing arena are immunoglobulin therapies, which have shown improved efficacy and safety for patients with PIDDs. While these types of therapies have been available for many years, it is only recently that so many additional options have become available for the PIDD patient population. It is imperative that medical directors, practicing physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals who manage PIDD patient populations have a solid understanding of differing options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

What’s New in the Evolving Treatment Paradigm in Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-lasting autoimmune disorder that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues. It typically results in warm, swollen, and painful joints, and pain and stiffness often worsen following rest. Most commonly, the wrist and hands are involved, with the same joints typically involved on both sides of the body. The disease may also affect other parts of the body, which results in a low red blood cell count, inflammation around the lungs, and inflammation around the heart. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), it is estimated that over 1.3 million people suffer from RA in the United States.

Diagnosis is done through examination, including x-rays and ultrasounds, and blood testing for certain indications and to rule out other possible causes for the symptoms. There is no cure for RA, treatment focuses on controlling the disease and its symptoms. However, even with all of the currently available non-biologic and biologic therapies, only about 1/3 of patients treated for RA ever achieve clinical remission. The remaining patients can experience continuous disease progression and disability. In addition, many patients will have an inadequate response or can become intolerant to the widely used anti-TNF therapies. Fortunately, new and emerging treatment strategies may offer additional therapeutic options to address the unmet needs of these patients. Clinicians have recently been equipped with more treatment options, including janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, and several more have just completed late stage clinical trials and are currently undergoing regulatory review.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Immunoglobulin Replacement in the Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDD): Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in PIDD: Strategies for Improving Administration and Managing Adverse Events

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in PIDD: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy?

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly. While not contagious, these diseases are caused by hereditary or genetic defects, and, although some disorders present at birth or in early childhood, the disorders can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender. Fortunately for patients with PIDD, the treatment paradigm has exploded in the past 10 years, giving HCPs many more options in managing the patient population. This live webinar series will feature strategies to overcome challenges in the optimal treatment of PIDD, updates on immunoglobulin replacement therapies, and practical managed care approaches to provide cost-effective solutions to improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

New Horizons in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD): What Managed Care Needs to Know About Novel Therapies

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder characterized by sickle-shaped red blood cells. It is a chronic, life-long, debilitating disease with many forms that can range in clinical severity from asymptomatic to life-threatening. In the US, SCD affects an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 Americans. Acute sickle cell pain crises, also referred to as vaso-occlusive crises, are a common painful complication of the disease and the main reason that patients seek medical care in hospitals. Currently, treatment options are limited. Several novel therapies are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials or regulatory review for SCD which will likely dramatically change the treatment paradigm. This webinar program on integrating emerging therapies into the treatment paradigm will address these novel treatment options, emerging value equations, the limitations of current treatment options, and recent clinical research on new agents to optimize the management of patients with SCD.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 31, 2020

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Cardiovascular

Therapeutic Advances in the Management of Hyperkalemia with End Stage Renal Disease: Improving Clinical and Cost Outcomes in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Novel Potassium Binders in the Management of Hyperkalemia with End Stage Renal Disease: Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Cost Outcomes

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in Hyperkalemia with End Stage Renal Disease: What Does Managed Care Need to Know about Newer Therapies?

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life Hyperkalemia with ESRD: Strategies for Detecting and Managing Adverse Events with Novel Therapies

Hyperkalemia, also known has high potassium, is an elevated level of potassium in the blood. Typically this results in no symptoms, but occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness. Decreased kidney function is a major cause of hyperkalemia, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperkalemia occurs in up to 10% of hospitalized patients and is associated increased morbidity if left unaddressed. Fortunately for patients who experience hyperkalemia, new therapies have become available in recent years that have shown improved efficacy and safety. Attendees will be updated on these novel options and how they can integrate them into the treatment paradigm and optimize costs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to November 1, 2022

Optimal Management Approaches in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Expert Strategies in Current and Emerging Treatments

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a progressive vascular disorder characterized by vascular remodeling of the pulmonary arteries which carry blood from the heart to the lungs. For those with PAH, the muscles within the arterial walls tighten, which can cause thickening and/or scar tissue to develop, increasingly narrowing their diameter. Over time, the heart muscle can become so weakened that its ability to pump enough blood through the body is lost, leading to heart failure. About half of people diagnosed with PAH will not live past five years. In 2019, the 6th World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension proposed an updated diagnostic definition of PAH and The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) also published new treatment guidelines. There continue to be significant challenges in identifying and diagnosing PAH because it requires a combination of information. Evaluation to detect the presence of PAH requires a comprehensive set of tests which typically include laboratory testing, echocardiography, pulmonary function testing, assessment of exercise capacity with six-minute walk distance, imaging, and right heart catheterization. There are a wide variety of treatment options to help manage PAH including nonspecific and targeted pharmacologic intervention. These include monotherapy and combination therapies that can include prostacyclin/prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

Best Practices in the Management of Heart Failure: What Managed Care Needs to Know About an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Heart failure (HF) is a common condition that affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure has traditionally been poor. HF is the reason for more than 1 million hospitalizations per year and an estimated $31 billion in costs in the U.S. each year. While recent efforts have focused on improving the outlook for patients with chronic heart failure, mortality and morbidity following admission for heart failure remain significant. In recent decades, an improved understanding of the pathobiology of HF has led to the introduction of a number of new classes of medications that have improved the clinical outcomes of HF patients. However, despite these advances, nearly 6 million people in the United States have HF. The 5-year mortality rate for HF remains unacceptably high at about 50%, and 30-day HF patient readmissions are approximately 25%. Although multiple therapies have been shown to lower mortality in patients with HF, their applications in clinical practice have been less than ideal. Fortunately for patients with HF, new and emerging therapeutic options have entered the treatment paradigm recently, including SGLT2 inhibitors, showing the ability to reduce the risk of cardiovascular (CV) death or the worsening of heart failure in patients with heart failure both with and without type 2 diabetes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Diabetes

Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: A Closer Look at the Evolving Role of SGLT2 Inhibitors

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes, and that one in three Americans born in 2020 will develop diabetes sometime during their lifetime. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), uncontrolled type 2 DM doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with type 2 DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of type 2 DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in Type 2 Diabetes management have given healthcare professionals the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap.

The economic cost of diabetes is staggering. Moreover, it has been estimated that people with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures that are approximately 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes. The price tag associated with treatment of type 2 DM increases with disease severity, as more and more dollars are spent managing the significant comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, associated with advanced type 2 DM. It is therefore imperative that measures be taken to ensure that each patient with type 2 DM receives optimal care to reduce the burden of this illness on the community. With so many options in type 2 diabetes treatment, healthcare professionals now have a better opportunity to ease this burden.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2021

Treatment Advances for Challenging Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: What Managed Care Needs to Know About Fixed-Ration Combinations of Basal Insulin and GLP-1

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Fixed-Ratio Combinations of Basal Insulin and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists: What Does the Data Have to Say?

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

What Managed Care Needs to Know about Reducing Healthcare Costs with Fixed-Ratio Combinations of Basal Insulin and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in Challenging Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Anticipating and Managing Adverse Events Associated with Basal Insulin and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

The ADA estimates that more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes. About 90-95% of adults who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) doubles a person’s risk for death, and on average individuals with T2DM lose 10-15 years of life. The management of T2DM remains a major challenge as many patients continue to struggle with achieving therapeutic goals, including control of A1C level, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. Fortunately, recent advances in treatments in T2DM management have given HCPs the ability to shrink this clinical practice gap. Fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and GLP-1 agonists have shown to improve both clinical and economic outcomes in T2DM patients, especially in challenging cases.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Infectious Disease

Turning the Tide on Serious Gram-negative Infections: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

Gram-negative bacteria represent an ongoing global healthcare challenge, with changing epidemiology and resistance patterns resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates among hospitalized patents. Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. Multidrug-resistant and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New antibiotics for preventing and managing these serious infections have recently been introduced, and other agents are in late stages of clinical development. These webinars will take a closer look what managed care professionals need to know about these new options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Optimizing Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Gram-negative Infections: Recent Advances for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Gram-negative bacteria represent an ongoing global healthcare challenge, with changing epidemiology and resistance patterns resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates among hospitalized patents. Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. Multidrug-resistant and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New antibiotics for preventing and managing these serious infections have recently been introduced, and other agents are in late stages of clinical development. These webinars will take a closer look what managed care professionals need to know about these new options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Turning the Tide on Serious Gram-negative Infections: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

Gram-negative bacteria represent an ongoing global healthcare challenge, with changing epidemiology and resistance patterns resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates among hospitalized patents. Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. Multidrug-resistant and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New antibiotics for preventing and managing these serious infections have recently been introduced, and other agents are in late stages of clinical development. These webinars will take a closer look what managed care professionals need to know about these new options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Prevention and Management of Recurrent C. difficile: Managed Care Considerations for Improved Patient Outcomes

The epidemiology and incidence of hospital- and community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past decade resulting in increased cases of initial and recurrent infection. Up to 25% of patients with an initial episode of CDI experience disease recurrence. Recurrent CDI is particularly challenging to manage.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Prevention and Management of Recurrent C. difficile Infection: Expert Perspectives for Improved Patient Outcomes

The epidemiology and incidence of hospital- and community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past decade resulting in increased cases of initial and recurrent infection. Up to 25% of patients with an initial episode of CDI experience disease recurrence. Recurrent CDI is particularly challenging to manage.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

Prevention and Management of Recurrent C. difficile Infection: What Managed Care Needs to Know

The epidemiology and incidence of hospital- and community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past decade resulting in increased cases of initial and recurrent infection. Up to 25% of patients with an initial episode of CDI experience disease recurrence. Recurrent CDI is particularly challenging to manage.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2022

New Treatment Breakthroughs in the Management of HIV: Expert Strategies for Optimized Clinical and Economic Outcomes

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. HIV infects vital cells in the human immune system such as helper T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 persons in the United States aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection. Fortunately for patients with HIV, several new therapies have become available over the past few years, and more are set to become available soon. Treatment regimens vary and carry important differences between therapeutic options that are clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. HIV treatment focuses on controlling the disease and living longer, healthier lives. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the use of HIV medicines to treat HIV infection. ART has evolved considerably over the past three decades. With many antiretroviral drugs, combinations, and classes available, health care providers have multiple choices regarding ART. One of the biggest challenges for clinicians is individualizing the care of HIV-positive patients and understanding when certain ART therapies and strategies are appropriate, and when they are not. Numerous studies have shown that ART must be tailored to the individual patient and his or her abilities and diverse needs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

Evolving Treatment Strategies in the Management of HIV: Individualized Therapy for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. HIV infects vital cells in the human immune system such as helper T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections.

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the use of HIV medicines to treat HIV infection. ART has evolved considerably over the past three decades. With many antiretroviral drugs, combinations, and classes available, health care providers have multiple choices regarding ART. While these choices provide clinicians with many useful options, they also lead to challenges. One of the biggest challenges for clinicians is individualizing the care of HIV-positive patients and understanding when certain ART therapies and strategies are appropriate, and when they are not. Numerous studies have shown that ART must be tailored to the individual patient and his or her abilities and diverse needs.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Confronting the Burden of Serious Infections: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Landscape

Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, C. Difficile bacterium, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. These infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New clinical practice guidelines are out and clinical best practices for optimal treatment of these challenging clinical situations will be discussed by experts in the infectious disease field, within the wider clinical context of responsible antimicrobial stewardship and managed care decision making. Each webinar will offer a new, specific view into the evolving management paradigm of serious infections, especially as it relates to overcoming barriers found amongst clinicians and managed care professionals.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

Overcoming Challenges in the Treatment and Management of Cytomegalovirus

Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, C. Difficile bacterium, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. These infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New clinical practice guidelines are out and clinical best practices for optimal treatment of these challenging clinical situations will be discussed by experts in the infectious disease field, within the wider clinical context of responsible antimicrobial stewardship and managed care decision making. Each webinar will offer a new, specific view into the evolving management paradigm of serious infections, especially as it relates to overcoming barriers found amongst clinicians and managed care professionals.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

Novel Approaches in the Management of Clostridium Difficile Infection

Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, C. Difficile bacterium, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. These infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New clinical practice guidelines are out and clinical best practices for optimal treatment of these challenging clinical situations will be discussed by experts in the infectious disease field, within the wider clinical context of responsible antimicrobial stewardship and managed care decision making. Each webinar will offer a new, specific view into the evolving management paradigm of serious infections, especially as it relates to overcoming barriers found amongst clinicians and managed care professionals.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

New Developments in the Management of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections

Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, C. Difficile bacterium, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) are a significant concern and can have serious consequences. These infections are increasing in prevalence, and their management is complicated by limited treatment options. New clinical practice guidelines are out and clinical best practices for optimal treatment of these challenging clinical situations will be discussed by experts in the infectious disease field, within the wider clinical context of responsible antimicrobial stewardship and managed care decision making. Each webinar will offer a new, specific view into the evolving management paradigm of serious infections, especially as it relates to overcoming barriers found amongst clinicians and managed care professionals.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to October 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Musculoskeletal & Rheumatology

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Landscape in Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes with Biomarkers and Individualized Management

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-lasting autoimmune disorder that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissues. It typically results in warm, swollen, and painful joints, and pain and stiffness often worsen following rest. Most commonly, the wrist and hands are involved, with the same joints typically involved on both sides of the body. The disease may also affect other parts of the body, which results in a low red blood cell count, inflammation around the lungs, and inflammation around the heart. Fortunately for patients with RA, several new medications have become available recently. Diagnosis is done through examination, including x-rays and ultrasounds, and blood testing for certain indications and to rule out other possible causes for the symptoms. There is no cure for RA, treatment is to control the pain, during flair ups especially, and to prevent joint damage.

Treatment regimens vary and carry important differences between therapeutic options that are clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. An understanding of the pathogenesis of RA and the role of different treatment approaches, including current and emerging therapies, will assist healthcare providers in determining the best course of therapeutic management for optimal long-term patient outcomes. RA treatment focuses on controlling the disease and its symptoms. However, with all of the currently available non-biologic and biologic therapies, only about 1/3 of patients treated for RA ever achieve clinical remission. Fortunately, new and emerging treatment strategies have offered additional therapeutic options to address the unmet needs of these patients. Clinicians have recently been equipped with more treatment options, including new biologic DMARDs, which have demonstrated an improved efficacy and safety.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology ,

Neurological

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease and is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the United States, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. In many cases, MS may not be diagnosed for months to years after the onset of symptoms. Some strategies for diagnosis include a careful medical history, a neurologic exam and various tests, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spinal fluid analysis. A number of factors must be considered when selecting a treatment regimen for patients with MS, including variations in clinical and MRI evidence of disease. Currently treatment is focused on disease-modifying agents, which helps lessen the frequency and severity of relapses, reduce lesions in the brain, and help slow or stop disability. Clinical data shows these agents have the ability to improve outcomes in both safety and efficacy as it relates to the management of patients with MS, especially in patients that haven’t responded to previous treatments. Effective and timely treatment of relapsing MS can greatly improve the quality of life in MS patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2022

New Frontiers for Neuromuscular Blockade Use and Reversal: Addressing Challenges for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are used in many surgical procedures and have enabled new surgical advances. The expanded landscape of NMB reversal drugs allows for fast and complete neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal and the reduction of postoperative complications from residual block. In the United States, neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and sugammadex are the primary agents for pharmacologic antagonism of NMBAs. While neostigmine and an anticholinergic have been available for decades, sugammadex has only recently become available. This webinar will take a close look at these options and what managed care needs to know about NMB and reversal in a variety of surgeries and clinical settings in which the use of NMB reversal agents played a significant role in the patients’ clinical outcome.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

New Frontiers for Neuromuscular Blockade Use and Reversal: Addressing Challenges for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are used in many surgical procedures and have enabled new surgical advances. The expanded landscape of NMB reversal drugs allows for fast and complete neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal and the reduction of postoperative complications from residual block. In the United States, neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and sugammadex are the primary agents for pharmacologic antagonism of NMBAs. While neostigmine and an anticholinergic have been available for decades, sugammadex has only recently become available. This webinar will take a close look at these options and what managed care needs to know about NMB and reversal in a variety of surgeries and clinical settings in which the use of NMB reversal agents played a significant role in the patients’ clinical outcome.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

New Frontiers for Neuromuscular Blockade Use and Reversal: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Paradigm

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are used in many surgical procedures and have enabled new surgical advances. The expanded landscape of NMB reversal drugs allows for fast and complete neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal and the reduction of postoperative complications from residual block. In the United States, neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and sugammadex are the primary agents for pharmacologic antagonism of NMBAs. While neostigmine and an anticholinergic have been available for decades, sugammadex has only recently become available. This webinar will take a close look at these options and what managed care needs to know about NMB and reversal in a variety of surgeries and clinical settings in which the use of NMB reversal agents played a significant role in the patients’ clinical outcome.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 15, 2022

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. ALS is a progressive disease in which the motor neurons eventually die and mortality is usually the result of respiratory failure. As there is no current cure for ALS, management focuses on treating symptoms and providing supportive care, with the goal of improving quality of life and prolonging survival in patients. This care is best provided by multidisciplinary teams of healthcare professionals; attending a multidisciplinary ALS clinic is associated with longer survival, fewer hospitalizations, and improved quality of life as they have access to the most recent treatments and management tools. Fortunately new agents have recently become available, or are undergoing clinical trials, that have shown the ability to slow functional decline in with ALS, giving providers and payers even more options to manage these populations and improve quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2021

Current Updates and Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease affecting the part of the nervous system that controls voluntary muscle movement. The disorders are caused by an abnormal or missing gene known as the survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1), which is responsible for the production of a protein essential to motor neurons. Without this protein, lower motor neurons in the spinal cord degenerate and die. Without a proper level of SMN protein, motor neurons in the spinal cord will be lost, preventing the body’s muscles from receiving signals from the brain. This can lead to progressive muscle weakness and wasting. The type of SMA (I, II, or III) is determined by the age of onset and the severity of symptoms. This neuromuscular disease is the second most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in white populations with an overall incidence of 1 in 10 000 live births and a carrier frequency of about 1/50.

The first step in the diagnosis of a neuromuscular disease are usually an in-office physical examination with questions centered around family history, with some simple blood tests that can indicate whether there are deletions or mutations of the SMN1 gene. Treating and managing spinal muscular atrophy requires a collaborative and multidisciplinary approach. Although there is no cure, there are current and emerging treatments that will help manage the symptoms and prevent complications. One of the more promising treatments can be administered by intrathecal injection into the fluid surrounding the spinal cord and is an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that increases the expression of a functional SMN protein. Another treatment involves gene therapy designed to deliver a copy of the SMN1 gene to motor neurons in SMA patients. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and rehabilitation may help to improve posture, prevent joint immobility, and slow muscle weakness and atrophy.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

Recent Evidence on the Management of Narcolepsy: Improving Outcomes through Expert Treatment Strategies

Narcolepsy is a chronic disorder of hypersomnia that affects the brain’s ability to control sleep-wake cycles. Narcolepsy patients experience severe excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) that leads to involuntary somnolence during regular activities that could put the patient and others in a harmful situation, such as driving, eating, or talking. Narcolepsy can interfere with psychological, social, and cognitive function and development and can inhibit academic, work, and social activities. Greater awareness of the disorder and its symptoms can help accurately and efficiently diagnosis the disease. As research continues to grow, better treatments for narcolepsy are becoming available. Sleep studies are an essential part of the evaluation and diagnosis of patients with narcolepsy. Symptoms can include EDS, sleep paralysis, hallucinations, but cataplexy is the most specific symptom and occurs in almost no other diseases. The combination of an overnight polysomnogram (PSG) followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) can provide the proper evidence of narcolepsy while excluding other sleep disorders.

Treatment of narcolepsy can include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic components. Most patients improve if they maintain a regular sleep schedule, which is typically around 8 hours per night. Pharmacologic treatment of narcolepsy involves the use of stimulants to the central nervous system such as methylphenidate, modafinil, dextroamphetamine sulfate, methamphetamine, and amphetamine. These medications help reduce daytime sleepiness, improving the symptoms in around 70% of patients. There are newer treatments that are currently undergoing clinical trials and are awaiting approval by the FDA, such as solriamfetol, which would help to treat excessive sleepiness in narcolepsy.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

Effective Ways to Manage Insomnia: Improving Outcomes though Optimal Treatment Strategies

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. Insomnia can also make you feel like you’re the only one still awake while the rest of the world sleeps. It can sap your energy level, affects you mood, and causes stress with your health, work performance and quality of life. The dangers of insomnia can affect more than just a person’s mood as people and if not treated properly can lead to other effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration problems, memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. Many adults experience acute insomnia, which can lasts for days or weeks and is usually the result of stress or a traumatic event in one’s life. There are some people that experience chronic insomnia which is long term and can lasts for a month or more. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease. About 25% of Americans experience acute insomnia each year with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.

There are a number of different approaches to the diagnosis of insomnia although there is no definitive test for it. Tools used for diagnosing the disease include a sleep log, which tracks the details of a person’s sleep, sleep inventory of sleeping patterns, blood tests and undergoing a sleep study. These tests will help determine the level of insomnia and what treatment plan should be utilized. Insomnia continues to be underdiagnosed and undertreated. Several experiencing insomnia try self-treatment with alcohol or over-the-counter products containing first-generation antihistamines, but that gives varying and underwhelming results. For these patients with poor results, identifying sleep hygiene issues can raise awareness of sleep patterns that need to be changed. Cognitive behavioral therapy has proven efficacy as first-line treatment for insomnia. This can include stimulus control therapy, relaxation techniques, and sleep restriction. However, there are some patients that do not respond to nonpharmacologic treatments and they need to supplement a patient’s nonpharmacologic treatment with a pharmacologic agent. The risks of the pharmacologic agent need to be balanced with its benefits, and the patient’s age and sleep pattern should be taken into account when selecting the optimal dose. The risk of side effects from these therapies continues to be examined as the pills can become addictive and if not taken properly can play a large role in the lack of proper adherence to the medications taken. There are new treatments that are in clinical trials, including a dual orexin receptor antagonist, which will help regulate sleep by dampening wakefulness without stopping the ability to awaken the external stimuli.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

Recent Advances in the Management of Epilepsy: Expert Treatment Strategies for Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder where the nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior. Epilepsy affects about 3 million people in the United States and accounts for about $15 billion in medical costs. For about 70 percent of those diagnosed with epilepsy, seizures can be controlled with medications and different surgical techniques. Some drugs are more effective for specific types of seizures. Patients who experience seizures, particularly those that are not easily controlled, need to seek out neurological guidance. The goal for neurologists is to achieve a seizure-free status for their patients without adverse effects. With that said there are still around 60% of patients that require treatment with anticonvulsants.

The diagnosis of epileptic seizures is made by analyzing the patient’s clinical history as well as performing neurophysiological and neuroimaging tests. Treatment of epilepsy involves reducing the number of seizures by administering various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This approach requires long-term adherence from patients. Unfortunately, more than one-third of people who experience seizures continue to have issues despite the medication given. Many patients do not have all the treatments available to them because their seizures are not adequately controlled, or because they experience severe adverse effects. The development of new AEDs continues to increase and drug therapies can now be individualized to the patient’s symptoms and needs. It is also important to understand the mechanisms of action and the pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs so that these agents can be used effectively in clinical practice, especially in the combined therapeutic strategies. Despite many of the available AED options, there is still a need for medications with novel mechanisms of action that are effective and well tolerated. Uncontrolled seizures and their associated comorbidities, such as depression, can have detrimental effects on the patient’s quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2021

Informed Decision-Making in the Treatment and Management of MS: Optimizing Therapeutic Switching and Sequencing

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the United States, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. A number of factors must be considered when selecting a treatment regimen for patients with MS, including variations in clinical and MRI evidence of disease. Over the past decade, there have been numerous revisions to MS diagnostic criteria and the development of multiple new and emerging therapies. While the explosion of these emerging therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s relapsing MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge that must be overcome through education. New options showing improved efficacy, safety and deliverability are now here, especially for patients who have not responded to previous treatments.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2021

ALS Series Webinars: New Horizons in the Management of ALS: Leveraging Emerging Therapeutic Breakthroughs to Make Informed Decisions

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

Improving Patient Adherence and Quality of Life in ALS: New Insights on Optimizing Adverse Event Management and Patient Health Maintenance

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Coordinated Care in ALS: What Managed Care Needs to Know about Novel Therapies

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into Available and Emerging Therapies in the Management of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): Individualizing Treatment for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the US are living with ALS. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS, but fortunately, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving healthcare professionals many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2022

Optimizing Treatment Regimens, Switching and Sequencing in Multiple Sclerosis: Leveraging Data to Make Informed Decisions

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

A Deeper Look into the Latest Data in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: Leveraging Recent Evidence to Make Informed Decisions

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Improving Quality of Life and Patient Adherence in Multiple Sclerosis: New Insights on Induction, Escalation, Oral Agents, and Monitoring

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

Comparative Effectiveness and Payer-Provider Coordination in Multiple Sclerosis: What Does Managed Care Need to Know?

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 400,000 cases throughout the US, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. While the explosion of these therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge. This webinar series will allow attendees to be aware of the current treatment landscape as well as the cost implications to best develop a benefits design strategy and treatment plans that can minimize the economic burden and optimize care.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2022

The Importance of Early Diagnosis in the Treatment and Management of Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder where the nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior. The diagnosis of epileptic seizures is made by analyzing the patient’s clinical history as well as performing neurophysiological and neuroimaging tests. Treatment of epilepsy involves reducing the number of seizures by administering various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The development of new AEDs continues to increase and drug therapies can now be individualized to the patient’s symptoms and needs. It is also important to understand the mechanisms of action and the pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs so that these agents can be used effectively in clinical practice, especially in the combined therapeutic strategies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Advances in the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Treatment Landscape: Optimal Management to Improve Patient Outcomes

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic, autosomal recessive disease, affecting the part of the nervous system that controls voluntary muscle movement. This neuromuscular disease is the second most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in white populations with an overall incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births and a carrier frequency of about 1 in 50. This disorder is caused by an abnormal or missing gene known as the survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1), which is responsible for the production of a protein essential to motor neurons. Without this protein, lower motor neurons in the spinal cord degenerate and die, preventing the body’s muscles from receiving signals from the brain. This can lead to progressive muscle weakness and wasting. SMA type (I, II, or III) is determined by the age of onset and the severity of symptoms. The first step in diagnosing a neuromuscular disease includes an in-office physical examination with questions centered around family history and simple blood tests to indicate whether deletions or mutations of the SMN1 gene are present. Treating and managing SMA requires a collaborative and multidisciplinary approach. Although there is no cure, there are current and emerging treatments that help manage the symptoms and prevent complications. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and rehabilitation may help to improve posture, prevent joint immobility, and slow muscle weakness and atrophy. One of the more promising treatments involves gene therapy designed to deliver a copy of the SMN1 gene to motor neurons in SMA patients. Once the SMN1 gene reaches patients’ cells, it supplements those cells’ own production of SMN protein.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Exploring Treatment Strategies to Improve Outcomes in the Management of Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a chronic disorder of hypersomnia that affects the brain’s ability to control sleep-wake cycles. Patients with narcolepsy, experience severe excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), sleep paralysis, hallucinations, and cataplexy which is the most specific symptom and occurs in almost no other diseases. Narcolepsy leads to involuntary somnolence during regular activities that potentially put the patient and others in harmful situations, such as driving, eating, or talking. Narcolepsy often interferes with psychological, social, and cognitive function and development and interferes with academic studies, work, and social activities. It is important for clinicians to understand and identify major sleep disorders and having greater awareness of the disorder and its symptoms can help accurately and efficiently diagnosis the disease. The combination of an overnight polysomnogram (PSG) followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) can provide the proper evidence of narcolepsy while excluding other sleep disorders. An MRI can also show structural abnormalities of the brain that may assist in depicting the underlying cause of the syndrome. Treatment of narcolepsy includes both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic components and most patients improve if they maintain a regular sleep schedule. Pharmacologic treatment of narcolepsy involves the use of stimulants to the central nervous system such as methylphenidate, modafinil, dextroamphetamine sulfate, methamphetamine, and amphetamine. These medications help reduce daytime sleepiness, improving the symptoms in around 70% of patients. In addition, novel treatment options, such as solriamfetol, are currently undergoing clinical trials and are awaiting approval by the FDA.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Therapeutic Switching and Sequencing in Multiple Sclerosis: Implementing Expert Strategies for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and the body. It involves an abnormal response of the immune system against the central nervous system, causing damaging inflammation.
In many cases, multiple sclerosis may not be diagnosed for months to years after the onset of symptoms. Some strategies for diagnosis include a careful medical history, a neurologic exam and various tests, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EP) and spinal fluid analysis. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage symptoms and improve their quality of life. Recent years have witnessed remarkable progress in our understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). Some new options showing improved efficacy, safety and deliverability have recently completed clinical trials and are currently undergoing regulatory review.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

Managing Insomnia: Optimal Treatment Goals to Improve Outcomes

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall or stay asleep, even when a person is tired and has the opportunity to do so. Insomnia is the second highest health related complaint worldwide as lack of adequate sleep saps energy levels, affects mood, and causes stress with overall health, work performance, and quality of life. The dangers of insomnia affect more than a person’s mood and if not treated properly can lead to adverse effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration and memory problems, reduced reaction time, poor immune system function, hypertension, and type II diabetes. Many adults experience acute insomnia at some point in their life, which can last for days or weeks and is usually the result of stress or a traumatic event.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Ophthalmology

Reducing Treatment Burden and Improving Outcomes in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD): What Managed Care Needs to Know about Emerging Therapies

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

Reducing Treatment Burden with Emerging Therapies in the Management of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD): Comparing Recent Clinical Trial Outcomes

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

Improving Quality of Life in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD): Evaluating New Dosing Options and Mechanisms for Delivery of Agents

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

What Managed Care Needs to Know about Emerging Therapies and Treatment Frequency in Management of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD)

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe vision loss among people aged 50 years and older. It is estimated that nearly 3 million individuals in the US will develop AMD by 2020 and that the prevalence will continue to increase due to the aging population. Neovascular, or “wet” AMD imposes a high burden on patients, eye care providers and payers alike, as optimal visual outcomes have been contingent on regular, ongoing treatment. Fortunately for patients with nAMD, new treatments have arrived or are on the horizon. This webinar series will feature strategies to reduce treatment burden and improve outcomes as experts will discuss the current burden of treatment, evaluate new dosing and administration schedules, as well as review the safety and efficacy of therapies in late-stage development.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Pulmonary

New Approaches in the Treatment and Management of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial lung disease (ILD) of unknown origin characterized by progressive lung scarring. It is the most common of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, and is a devastating disease associated with irreversible destruction of the lung. The scarring in the lungs gets progressively worse and it makes it difficult for patients to breathe as well as keep adequate levels of oxygen in the bloodstream. The condition affects approximately 3 million people worldwide and has a substantial burden to patients, their families, and the overall healthcare system. Patients with IPF can progress slowly with the right treatment, while others experience rapid lung decline, which presents several diagnostic and management-related challenges. IPF typically has a poor prognosis and the median survival rate is less than four years or fewer from diagnosis. Most patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis present with a gradual onset, which makes it difficult to diagnosis early.

The diagnosis of IPF in most cases involves an in-depth review of both medication and environmental exposure histories followed by a high-resolution computed tomography scan (HRCT). Depending on the results of the HRCT, an analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or surgical lung biopsy may be performed, and with a proper evaluation of the HRCT results combined with a histopathology pattern, confirms a diagnosis of IPF. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, the goals of IPF management are to ameliorate symptoms, improve health status, preserve lung function, maintain adequate oxygenation with supplemental oxygen, minimize adverse events of therapy, reduce the frequency of acute exacerbations and, ideally, improve overall patient care and outcomes. Treatment strategies for IPF aim at managing the symptoms and slowing disease progression to best maintain a patient’s quality of life. There continue to be advancements in the current treatment regimens. More recently, therapeutic options for IPF have evolved to include targeted agents that have the ability to individualize treatment for patients.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2021

Best Practices in the Treatment and Management of Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Recent Updates and Advances in CFTR Therapy

Cystic fibrosis (CF), also known as mucoviscidosis, is a genetic, autosomal recessive disorder that affects mostly the lungs but also the pancreas, liver, kidneys and intestine. It is caused by the presence of mutations in both copies of the gene for the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Those with a single working copy are carriers and otherwise mostly normal. CFTR is involved in production of sweat, digestive fluids, and mucus. When CFTR is not functional, secretions which are usually thin instead become thick. The condition is diagnosed by a sweat test and genetic testing. Long-term issues include difficulty breathing and coughing up sputum as a result of frequent lung infections. Other symptoms include sinus infections, poor growth, fatty stool, clubbing of the finger and toes, and infertility in males among others. According to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, about 30,000 people are currently living with cystic fibrosis, and approximately 1,000 new cases of CF are diagnosed each year. There is no cure for cystic fibrosis, but recent treatment breakthroughs have the ability to provide a greater quality of life and improved outcomes for patients with CF, especially in combination therapy.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 1, 2021

Optimizing Outcomes with CFTR Modulator Therapy in the Management of Cystic Fibrosis: A Closer Look at the Role of Combination Therapy

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic, autosomal recessive disorder that mainly affects the lungs but also the pancreas, liver, kidneys, and the intestines. Difficulty breathing and coughing up sputum as a result of frequent lung infections are characteristics of this disease. Other symptoms include sinus infections, poor growth, fatty stool, clubbing of the finger and toes, and infertility in males among others. Patients may have different degrees of symptoms due to several mutation classes in CF. According to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, about 30,000 people are currently living with CF and approximately 1,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Although there is no cure for CF recent treatment breakthroughs have been able to reduce hospital admissions, enable easier breathing, provide a greater quality of life, and improve outcomes for patients. Fortunately for about half of CF patients, a new treatment is available for those who have two copies of the F508del mutation in their CFTR gene. This new CFTR modulation therapeutic focuses on counteracting the damage caused by the disease. This option is a major breakthrough in CF management as it is the first therapy that specifically targets an important genetic mutation.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Urology

Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes with Personalized Treatment in Management of Overactive Bladder (OAB)

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent condition that approximately 17% of women and 16% of men over 18 suffer from, that’s an estimated 33 million people; however the numbers may be higher due to undiagnosed cases. OAB occurs about twice as frequently in women as in men, and while OAB is not considered a normal part of aging, it does become more prevalent with advanced age. OAB has a significant impact on quality of life (QoL), co-morbidities and cost; sufferers are two to three times more likely to experience disturbed sleep, overeating, poor self-esteem, and depression. Despite its impact, OAB remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. Screening and evaluating patients are of utmost importance in order to improve diagnosis and patient QoL. There are a variety of treatments available and typically a stepwise progression is implemented in OAB management. Multiple options of treatment are available in each line of therapy which provide for a tailored approach. This method allows for an individualized treatment plan based upon a patient’s expectations and goals for treatment, their co-morbidities, symptoms, and medication side-effects. What works and does not work will vary patient to patient, and it’s important to keep communications open to determine if a patient is unable to remain compliant to treatment due to side-effects or cost.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to February 1, 2021

 

Navigate to:  Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine | Behavioral Health | Chronic Illness: Autoimmune,  Cardiovascular,  Diabetes, Infectious Disease,  Musculoskeletal/Rheumatology,  Neurological,  Ophthalmology,  Pulmonary, Urology , Additional Topics

Additional Topics

Recent Advances in the Treatment and Management of NASH

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a progressive spectrum of liver disorders that includes among its more severe forms nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide, affecting an estimated 25% of the world’s population. The disease can be characterized as inflammation of the liver and the damage caused by a buildup of fat in the liver and may worsen, causing scarring of the liver which can lead to cirrhosis. Closely associated with rising rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of these conditions continues to increase creating a clinical and economic burden. NASH can lead to significant morbidity and mortality, including liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NASH remains underdiagnosed and undertreated as patients may have no symptoms at all which makes it hard to diagnosis. As NASH continues to progress and the liver damage gets worse, patients may experience fatigue, weight loss, overall weakness and an ache in the upper right part of the belly.

Fatty liver disease and advanced forms of fibrosis have limited treatment options. The first line of treatment at this time is usually weight loss through a combination of a healthy diet and exercise. For those who have cirrhosis due to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, liver transplantation may be an option. Outcomes of liver transplant in this population group are generally very good. NASH, described as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, remains challenging to diagnose and treat, but significant advances have been made in the recent years. There are several agents that are on the horizon and still more that are in clinical trials that look promising to help treat this growing disease.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to June 1, 2021

Copyright permissions

To the best of our knowledge permissions for use of any copyright materials was received by each individual presenter. NAMCP/AAMCN does receive permissions to record, transcribe and publish materials (slides and audio) from each speaker. These permissions are on file at NAMCP headquarters.

For more information contact Jeremy Williams at 804-527-1905 or jwilliams@namcp.org.
Disclaimer

NAMCP and or this website does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. NAMCP does not endorse or imply endorsement of the content on any linked website. This website is to be used as an informational resource. With any health related concern, consult with your physician or healthcare professional.