Health Management

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Preventive Health & Lifestyle Medicine

Behavioral Health

Chronic Illnesses

 

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• Have increased knowledge regarding the
o Burden of adverse effects associated with anticholinergic therapy in patients with OAB
o Role of beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists in the management of OAB
o Unmet needs surrounding the pharmacoeconomics of medications used to treat OAB
• Demonstrate greater confidence in their ability to
o Appropriately manage patients with OAB

 

AutoImmune

Integrating Novel Approaches in Psoriasis Management: Closing the Gaps with Innovative Treatment Strategies

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million of the population in the United States. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. The main disease activity leading to psoriasis occurs in the epidermis, the top five layers of the skin. The disease most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumbosacral areas of the body. Many of the patients are not receiving the appropriate treatment discussed in the current guidelines and standards of care. Psoriasis is a complex disease to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. The under diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis continues to be a serious concern. It is for these reasons that there needs to be continuing education that addresses the treatment gaps and challenges in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of psoriasis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Advanced Insights for Patients with Psoriasis: Understanding the Latest Clinical Evidence and Shared Decision-Making Options

Psoriasis is a complex, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects approximately 7 million of the population in the United States. Psoriasis is a periodic flare-up of sharply defined red patches, covered by a silvery, flaky surface. The main disease activity leading to psoriasis occurs in the epidermis, the top five layers of the skin. The disease most commonly appears on the skin of the scalp, elbow, knees, and lumbosacral areas of the body. Many of the patients are not receiving the appropriate treatment discussed in the current guidelines and standards of care. Psoriasis is a complex disease to manage, but the goal should be a patient-centered treatment that reduces disease burden, improves on quality-of-life, and addresses the risks of systemic complications and comorbid conditions. The under diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis continues to be a serious concern. It is for these reasons there needs to be continuing education that addresses the treatment gaps and challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and management of psoriasis.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Achieving Treatment Goals for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: New Evidence and Updates to Guide Treatment Plans

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, frequently progressive condition that affects approximately 1.6 million people in the United States. This lifelong, systemic autoimmune illness often strikes patients at a young age and must be managed across a lifetime. According to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, there are as many as 70,000 new cases diagnosed in a year. The diagnosis of IBD is most commonly based on imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization, which may also include a combination of endoscopy and histopathology. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of IBD patients. The treatment goal for IBD is to reduce the inflammation, in hopes of achieving reduced symptoms and possibly remission. Immediate goals are to control the symptoms, induction of remission, and to help improve a patient’s quality of life, while long-term goals include maintenance of a corticosteroid-free clinical remission, mucosal healing, endoscopic remission, prevention or cure of complications, restoration, and maintenance of proper nutrition. The first step for IBD treatment is aminosalicylates, which are useful for treating flares of IBD and for maintaining remission. There is also the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections that may result from abscesses or fistulas. Corticosteroids can be used, as they are rapid-acting anti-inflammatory agents, but they are indicated for acute flares of disease only and have no role in the maintenance of remission. Immunomodulators have a slower onset of action and work to reduce patients’ overactive immune system but unlike corticosteroids, they can be used as a long-term treatment. Now treatment guidelines include the use of biologics, which are proteins that stop certain molecules in the body from causing inflammation in the GI tract. These are usually prescribed to those living with moderate to severe cases of IBD who have not responded to other types of treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Transforming Management Strategies by Integrating Biosimilars into the Treatment Landscape

Biosimilar products are biologic products that are highly similar to already approved biologic drugs developed for various indications. While biosimilars have some differences compared with their reference products, they are mandated to produce identical similarity from their reference biologics in terms of clinical safety and efficacy. As such, these biosimilar products promise to foster unprecedented access to a wide range of life-saving biologics while ensuring a rise in healthcare access and market sustainability. Biosimilars are expected to have a significant impact on healthcare as they revolutionize the treatments of many disease states. Biosimilars have the potential to reduce healthcare costs and expand patient access to biologic therapies. The high cost of biologic drugs in immunology imposes a substantial burden on the US healthcare system and has created numerous patient access challenges. In recent years, there has been a shift in FDA approvals for biosimilars, with multiple biosimilars for oncology-related supportive care and disease-specific therapeutic indications available on the US market. Healthcare professionals should be appropriately educated about the cost-saving benefits associated with biosimilars. These cost-savings may be significant for patient populations affected by socioeconomic challenges or other healthcare disparities that may limit access to treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Innovative Approaches in the Treatment and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE): Key Considerations in Managed Care Decision-Making

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by recurrent attacks of edema at different locations of the body. This potentially life-threatening disease affects approximately 1 in 67,000 individuals, with no identified differences in sex or ethnicity. HAE is characterized by recurrent edema attacks and the cutaneous attacks can be disabling, with the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and upper airways are most commonly affected and with a persistent risk to the patient of acute events of laryngeal swelling that may prove fatal if not treated in a timely manner. Angioedema in general can be confused with cellulitis, Graves disease, blepharochalasis, eosinophilic fasciitis, or amyloidosis which can lead to delays in diagnosis, and inappropriate treatment poses the risk of adverse events, unnecessary surgical interventions, a higher burden of misery, and a potentially higher rate of morbidity and mortality. Fortunately for patients with HAE, novel therapies have recently become available in the past few years that have shown improved efficacy and safety with improved administration methods. Additionally, new monoclonal antibody therapies targeted at younger HAE populations are on the horizon. With these new options comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, pharmacists, immunologists and nurse case managers as the treatment paradigm is growing. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, including throughout formulary and health plan discussions, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the HAE patient population.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

 

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Cardiovascular

Informed Managed Care Decision-Making in the Management of Worsening Heart Failure: Optimizing Outcomes with New and Emerging Therapies

Heart failure (HF) is a common condition that affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure has traditionally been poor. Projections show that by 2030, the prevalence of heart failure will increase 46 percent from recent estimates. HF is the reason for more than 1 million hospitalizations per year and an estimated $31 billion in costs in the U.S. each year. While recent efforts have focused on improving the outlook for patients with chronic heart failure, mortality and morbidity following admission for heart failure remain significant. Fortunately for patients with HF, new and emerging therapeutic options have entered the treatment paradigm recently, including SGLT2 inhibitors, showing the ability to improve clinical and economic outcomes for the patient and system, which makes it imperative to update medical directors, practicing physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals on recent clinical data and recommendation updates regarding these new therapy options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

A New Horizon for Patients With PAH: Targeted Treatments for Improved Outcomes

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a progressive vascular disorder characterized by vascular remodeling of the pulmonary arteries which carry blood from the heart to the lungs. For those with PAH, the muscles within the arterial walls tighten, which can cause thickening and/or scar tissue to develop, increasingly narrowing their diameter. This leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance that leads to right ventricular failure and significant morbidity and mortality. Over time, the heart muscle can become so weakened that its ability to pump enough blood through the body is lost, leading to heart failure. The estimated prevalence is between 15 and 50 cases per million individuals and about half of people diagnosed with PAH will not live past five years, while those with untreated PAH have an average survival expectancy of approximately three years following diagnosis – and even with aggressive management, PAH has a 15% annual mortality rate.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

The Impact of PCSK9 Modulation on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Lipid Management: Recent Advances and Managed Care Considerations

Over 73 million adults in the United States have hypercholesterolemia and are at elevated risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a primary mediator of the development of heart disease and plays a key role in determining cardiovascular risk and overall health management. Early and aggressive lowering of LDL-C reduces the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events in patients with hypercholesterolemia, and every 1.0 mmol/L reduction in LDL-C is estimated to lead to ~20% reduction in the relative risk of major cardiovascular events. Statins are the mainstay of hypercholesterolemia management, but many patients do not tolerate statin-based treatment, which ultimately leads to medication nonadherence, ASCVD events, and higher healthcare costs. On the other hand, some patients, including those with pre-existing ASCVD or severe hypercholesterolemia, do not reach recommended LDL-C treatment targets despite intensive statin therapy. Non-statin agents can be useful for patients who inadequately respond to or are intolerant of statin therapy. Fortunately for patients with high LDL-C, several new treatments have recently become available as an adjunct or instead of statin therapies. These options, including agents that inhibit production of PCSK9, have shown improved efficacy and safety, offering patients the potential for improved outcomes and quality of life. With so many new options becoming available in recent years that have shown the ability to lower LDL-C and reduce cardiovascular risk in lipid management, it is critical that physician medical directors, payers, cardiologists, pharmacy directors, pharmacists, nurse case managers, and other HCPs are updated on the comparisons among safety, efficacy, and administration data on these options, possible strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm, and key points that managed care professionals need to know, which will ultimately improve both clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Innovative Approaches in the Treatment and Management of Heart Failure: Managed Care Considerations on the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Heart failure (HF) is a common condition that affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure has traditionally been poor. Projections show that by 2030, the prevalence of heart failure will increase 46 percent from recent estimates. HF is the reason for more than 1 million hospitalizations per year and an estimated $31 billion in costs in the U.S. each year. While recent efforts have focused on improving the outlook for patients with chronic heart failure, mortality and morbidity following admission for heart failure remain significant. Fortunately for patients with HF, new and emerging therapeutic options have entered the treatment paradigm in recent years, including selective cardiac myosin activators, showing the ability to improve clinical and economic outcomes for the patient and system, which makes it imperative to update medical directors, practicing physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals on recent clinical data and recommendation updates regarding these new therapy options.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

 

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Diabetes

 

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Infectious Disease

Novel HIV Prevention and Management Strategies: Optimizing PrEP and ART Managed Care Decision Making for Improved Outcomes

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. HIV infects vital cells in the human immune system such as helper T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 persons in the United States aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection. Additionally, an estimated 15,815 people died from HIV and AIDS in 2022. Fortunately for patients with HIV, several new therapies have become available over the past year, including long-acting injectable therapies for both treatment and PrEP and options for heavily treatment-experienced (HTE) patients. With so many new options entering the treatment paradigm, it is critical that medical directors, practicing physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options and guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm and individualizing therapy, which will ultimately improve clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Addressing the Barriers to Optimal Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Enhancing Confidence to Overcome Suboptimal Vaccination Practices

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. And now that is even more true with the COVID-19 pandemic of the last few years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This activity will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults, and the affect that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on these immunizations. Participants will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Overcoming Barriers to Adolescent and Adult Immunizations: Practical Strategies for Improved Outcomes in Suboptimal Vaccination Practices

The world of immunizations in adolescents and adults has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. And now that is even more true with the COVID-19 pandemic of the last few years. From newer vaccines to changing guidelines, the landscape has changed for payers, providers and patients. This webcast will take a close look at those changes on immunizations in adolescents and adults, and the affect that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on these immunizations. Attendees will be updated on the latest data and guidelines to help increase rates, costs and patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Addressing the Barriers to Optimized HIV Management: Navigating ART and PrEP Decision Making for Improved Clinical and Economic Outcomes

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus that causes HIV infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. HIV infects vital cells in the human immune system such as helper T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. HIV infection leads to low levels of CD4+ T cells through a number of specific mechanisms. When CD4+ T cell numbers decline below a critical level, cell-mediated immunity is lost, and the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections. The CDC estimates that 1,218,400 persons in the United States aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection. Additionally, an estimated 15,815 people died from HIV and AIDS in 2021. Fortunately for patients with HIV, several new therapies have become available over the past year, including long-acting injectable therapies for both treatment and PrEP and options for heavily treatment-experienced (HTE) patients. With so many new options entering the treatment paradigm, it is critical that medical directors, practicing physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals are updated on these emerging options and guidelines and strategies for implementing them into the treatment paradigm and individualizing therapy, which will ultimately improve clinical and economic outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

 

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Musculoskeletal & Rheumatology

 

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Neurological

Targeting New Strategies in Narcolepsy and Idiopathic Hypersomnia: Novel Approaches to Diagnosis and Treatment

Hypersomnia is characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive daytime sleepiness or prolonged nighttime sleep. It challenges work life, social life, and home life. Hypersomnia may be caused by another sleep disorder (such as narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea), dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, or drug or alcohol abuse. In some cases, it results from a physical problem, such as a tumor, head trauma, or injury to the central nervous system. Even when factors such as treatment adherence, medications, comorbid illness, and inadequate sleep duration are controlled, up to 33% of all Americans still experience some typical of sleep-depravity. For most people, mild sleepiness is apparent only during boring, sedentary situations, however patients with narcolepsy, severe hypersomnia, can lead to involuntary somnolence during regular activities that could put the patient and others in a harmful situation, such as driving, eating, or talking.
Idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) is a sleep disorder in which a person feels excessive tiredness, even after a full and uninterrupted night of sleep. People with this condition may sleep longer than normal, sometimes 11 or more hours a night, yet still feel tired during the day. With the potential danger surrounding narcoleptic patients, it is important for clinicians to understand and identify major sleep disorders and the best methods to diagnose and treat them. Greater awareness of sleep disorders and their symptoms can help accurately and efficiently diagnosis the disease. As research continues to grow, better treatments for narcolepsy are becoming available. Sleep studies are an essential part of the evaluation and diagnosis of patients with narcolepsy. Symptoms can include EDS, sleep paralysis, hallucinations, but cataplexy is the most specific symptom and occurs in almost no other diseases. The combination of an overnight polysomnogram (PSG) followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) can provide the proper evidence of narcolepsy while excluding other sleep disorders.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Alzheimer’s Disease: Managed Care Considerations on Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5 million people in the United States. It is a cognitive disorder that includes behavioral impairment that interferes with social and occupational functioning. Over time the disease destroys large areas of the brain, resulting in cellular loss and dysfunction, a gradual loss of memory, problems with reasoning or judgment, disorientation, difficulty in learning, loss of language skills, and decline in the ability to perform routine tasks. Although not all memory loss indicates Alzheimer’s disease, one in ten people over 65 years of age, and over half of those over 85 have Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, 26 million people worldwide have this dementia. By the year 2050, over 15 million Americans may be affected with the disease. Alzheimer’s disease care costs $200 billion annually in the United States alone. Fortunately for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, new and emerging therapies, including anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) monoclonal antibodies, are undergoing late stage clinical trials or have been recently made available, giving medical directors and clinicians options for providing patients with significant reductions in clinical decline. With new options on the horizon, it is imperative that managed care physician medical directors, practicing physicians, pharmacists, payers, nurses and other healthcare professionals who manage Alzheimer’s disease patient populations have a solid understanding of these options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application, and to be prepared if they are made available.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Moving Beyond the Challenges of Insomnia: New Opportunities in an Expanding Therapeutic Landscape

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. This can affect a person’s sleep so much that they still feel tired after they wake up. Insomnia can also make patients feel that they are the only one still awake while the rest of the world sleeps. It can sap your energy level, affect your mood, and causes stress with your health, work performance and quality of life. The dangers of insomnia can affect more than just a person’s mood and if not treated properly can lead to other effects such as anxiety, depression, irritability, concentration problems, memory problems, poor immune system function, and reduced reaction time. Many adults experience acute insomnia, which can last for days or weeks and is usually the result of stress or a traumatic event in one’s life. There are some people that experience chronic insomnia which is long term and can last for a month or more. There are 60 million Americans affected by the disease. About 25% of Americans experience acute insomnia each year with around 10% experiencing chronic insomnia.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Managed Care Considerations in the Management of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): A Closer Look at the Emerging Role of Oral Therapy Options

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. An estimated 20,000 people in the United States are living with ALS. It is a progressive disease in which the motor neurons eventually die. Mortality is usually the result of respiratory failure. Although most patients with ALS die within 3 to 5 years after symptoms first appear, about 20% of patients with ALS will live 5 years, 10% will live 10 years, and about 5% will live 20 years or more. Currently, there is no cure for ALS. Fortunately for patients with ALS, the treatment paradigm has expanded in recent years, giving medical directors and clinicians many more options in managing symptoms and delaying progression in the ALS patient population. Additionally, these treatments have now changed administration methods, giving clinicians and managed care professionals more options for ALS patients and members. With new options expanding the treatment armamentarium in ALS, a knowledge gap has been created, making it imperative that managed care physician medical directors, practicing physicians, pharmacists, payers, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who manage ALS patient populations have a solid understanding of differing options to optimize both costs and patient outcomes in their therapeutic application.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

Navigating an Increasingly Complex Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Key Considerations in Managed Care Decision-Making

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease. It is the most common neurological cause of disability among young adults, with a prevalence of approximately 1 million cases throughout the United States, and every week around 200 people are diagnosed with the disease. Although there is still no cure for MS, many advances in MS treatment have arrived in recent years, allowing patients to manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. A number of factors must be considered when selecting a treatment regimen for patients with MS, including variations in clinical and MRI evidence of disease. Over the past decade, there have been numerous revisions to MS diagnostic criteria and the development of multiple new and emerging therapies. While the explosion of these emerging therapies have shown the ability to improve outcomes and quality of life in patient’s MS, it makes staying current with best practices a challenge that must be overcome through education. New options showing improved efficacy, safety and deliverability have arrived and it is for this reason that medical directors, neurologists, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals must be updated on the current and emerging treatments and strategies in the management of MS.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

 

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Ophthalmology

 

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Pulmonary

New Frontiers in the Treatment and Management of Cystic Fibrosis: Managed Care Considerations in an Evolving Treatment Paradigm

Cystic fibrosis (CF), also known as mucoviscidosis, is a genetic disorder that affects mostly the lungs but also the pancreas, liver, kidneys and intestine. While newborn screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to greater recognition of disease, patients with CF continue to experience severe disease complications and high rates of health care resource utilization. Patients with CF require lifelong, daily prophylactic regimens to prevent exacerbations and improve disease symptoms to maintain lung function. However, CF treatment is shifting from symptomatic management to targeting the underlying CFTR mutations to manage disease progression and prevent recurring complications associated with CF. Managed care professionals have a significant role in informing patients with CF and caregivers about these available and emerging treatment interventions and ensuring access to therapies. Through member surveys, interviews, outcome reports and past conference evaluations, NAMCP has seen a great need for more education on the newer treatments in CF. It is critical to provide medical directors, practicing physicians, nurse case managers and other healthcare professionals on the updated treatment paradigm and management strategies in CF.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2024

 

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Urology

 

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Additional Topics

Informed Managed Care Decision-Making in the Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE): Optimizing Clinical and Economic Outcomes in an Evolving Paradigm

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by recurrent attacks of edema at different locations of the body. This potentially life-threatening disease affects approximately 1 in 67,000 individuals, with no identified differences in sex or ethnicity. HAE is characterized by recurrent edema attacks and the cutaneous attacks can be disabling, with the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and upper airways are most commonly affected and with a persistent risk to the patient of acute events of laryngeal swelling that may prove fatal if not treated in a timely manner. Angioedema in general can be confused with cellulitis, Graves disease, blepharochalasis, eosinophilic fasciitis, or amyloidosis which can lead to delays in diagnosis, and inappropriate treatment poses the risk of adverse events, unnecessary surgical interventions, a higher burden of misery, and a potentially higher rate of morbidity and mortality. Fortunately for patients with HAE, novel therapies have recently become available in the past year and a half that have shown improved efficacy and safety with improved administration methods. Additionally, new monoclonal antibody therapies that have shown improved efficacy and safety are on the horizon. With these new options comes a knowledge gap among physician medical directors, pharmacists, immunologists, and nurse case managers as the treatment paradigm is growing. For this reason, it is critical that these HCPs are educated and updated on these emerging options and strategies for their implementation into the treatment paradigm, including throughout formulary and health plan discussions, which will ultimately improve patient outcomes in the HAE patient population.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

New Horizons in the Treatment and Management of Chronic Cough: Key Managed Care Considerations on the Role of New and Emerging Therapies

Chronic cough, which is observed in approximately 12% of the US population, is defined as a cough that lasts for more than 8 weeks. Patients with chronic cough are often distressed by the condition, which can lead to depression, anxiety, a decline in quality of life, and changes to their social activities. The diagnosis and management of chronic cough can be challenging, with only approximately 50% of patients receiving a diagnosis. Recent advances have been made in the understanding and management of refractory chronic cough, with several novel therapies being evaluated in ongoing clinical studies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Advancing Patient-Centric Strategies to Optimize Menopause Care: Exploring the Management of Vasomotor Symptoms

Menopause is a routine, non-pathologic condition involving the permanent cessation of menses for at least 12 months and occurs in all menstruating females due to non-pathologic estrogen deficiency. In the United States, approximately 1.3 million women become menopausal each year. It typically begins between the ages of 51 and 52, although some women experience premature menopause before the age of 40, due to permanent ovarian failure that may be associated with sex chromosome abnormalities. Menopause symptoms vary, but 75% of women experience vasomotor symptoms (VMS). These include hot flashes, night sweats, palpitations, and migraines. Woman can also experience urogenital symptoms and psychogenic symptoms, which can include anxiety, depression, sexual dysfunction, and migraines.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Incorporating Biosimilars into the Clinical Landscape: Expert Insights for Managed Care Considerations

Biosimilar products are biologic products that are highly similar to already approved biologic drugs developed for various indications. While biosimilars have some differences compared with their reference products, they are mandated to produce identical similarity from their reference biologics in terms of clinical safety and efficacy. As such, these biosimilar products promise to foster unprecedented access to a wide range of life-saving biologics while ensuring a rise in healthcare access and market sustainability.

Biosimilars are expected to have a significant impact on healthcare as they revolutionize the treatments of many disease states. Biosimilars have the potential to reduce healthcare costs and expand patient access to biologic therapies. The high cost of biologic drugs in immunology imposes a substantial burden on the US healthcare system and has created numerous patient access challenges. In recent years, there has been a shift in FDA approvals for biosimilars, with multiple biosimilars for oncology-related supportive care and disease-specific therapeutic indications available on the US market. Healthcare professionals should be appropriately educated about the cost-saving benefits associated with biosimilars. These cost-savings may be significant for patient populations affected by socioeconomic challenges or other healthcare disparities that may limit access to treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to March 1, 2025

Copyright permissions

To the best of our knowledge permissions for use of any copyright materials was received by each individual presenter. NAMCP/AAMCN does receive permissions to record, transcribe and publish materials (slides and audio) from each speaker. These permissions are on file at NAMCP headquarters.

For more information contact Jeremy Williams at 804-527-1905 or jwilliams@namcp.org.
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